Design School Were No Dunces; from Sculpture to Ceramics or Skateboarders!

Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England), October 19, 2007 | Go to article overview

Design School Were No Dunces; from Sculpture to Ceramics or Skateboarders!


Byline: Karen McLauchlan reports

THE most significant exhibition of the iconic Germany Bauhaus design movement for 30 years, focussing on the Bauhaus School between 1919 and 1933, will be unveiled at mima on November 23.

BAUHAUS REVIEWED 1919-1933, which runs until February 17, 2008, will include works by leading members of the movement - Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky and Josef Albers.

Also on display will be film works by Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, architectural models, design, applied art, furniture and a specially commissioned wall drawing.

The original manifesto designed by Lyonel Feininger and written by architect Walter Gropius will be among the works on display.

The wider exhibition encompasses photography of significant Bauhaus architecture and an exhibition of Bauhaus inspired contemporary art.

Much of 20th and 21st century art and design owes its existence to the Bauhaus. The legacy of the Bauhaus is strongly felt within contemporary culture, resonating through to the current fixation with restyling our domestic environments, social engagement with aesthetics and design-led lifestyles.

The exhibition is part of North-east England's programme of world-class festival and events for 2007, managed by culture10 based at NewcastleGateshead Initiative.

Linking Bauhaus to the present, Language of Vision will also showcase works by contemporary artists whose practice has a relationship to the legacy of the Bauhaus.

Selected works are presented alongside new commissions by artists including Markus Amm, Camilla Low, Toby Paterson, Ryan Gander, Lothar Gotz and Andrew Miller.

The title of the exhibition comes from a book by the writer Gyorgy Kepes published in 1944, a friend and collaborator of Bauhaus master Moholy-Nagy, influential in articulating the Bauhaus principles.

Alongside this, mima will present a series of photographs by Hans Engels, of the original Bauhaus architecture, constructed by the masters and students of the Bauhaus between 1919 and 1933.

Focusing on a number of well known and surprising examples of Bauhaus architecture in their present condition, Engels who has specialised in architectural photography for over 20 years, documents all the known, many forgotten, restored and converted Bauhaus buildings.

The buildings were constructed during a period beginning with the foundation of the Bauhaus in Weimar in 1919, through its first dissolution in Dessau by the National Socialist regime in 1932, and final closure in Berlin a year later.

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Design School Were No Dunces; from Sculpture to Ceramics or Skateboarders!
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