Achieving Higher Levels of Success for A.D.H.D. Students Working in Collaborative Groups

By Simplicio, Joseph S. C. | Journal of Instructional Psychology, September 2007 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Achieving Higher Levels of Success for A.D.H.D. Students Working in Collaborative Groups


Simplicio, Joseph S. C., Journal of Instructional Psychology


This article explores a new and innovative strategy for helping students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (A.D.H.D.) achieve higher levels of academic success when working in collaborative groups. Since the research indicates that students with this disorder often have difficulty in maintaining their concentration this strategy is designed to help these students better focus on their responsibilities. In turn, it is hoped that they will be more successful in completing their assignments. The rationale of the strategy centers on developing alternative methodologies of assigning tasks to A.D.H.D. students working in collaborative groups. Although no single paradigm will guarantee success for all A.D.H.D. students, this strategy affords teachers the opportunity to help their students move toward achieving their potential.

**********

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, better know as A.D.H.D. "... is a diagnostic label that we have given children ... who have significant problems in four main areas of their lives: inattention, impulsivity, hyperactivity, boredom" (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Information Library, 2006). Although the disorder affects only about 5% of the children in the United States, these four simple words have permanently changed the landscape of education. As teachers can attest, these students have proven to be a real challenge in the everyday classroom. School s have tried to tackle the effects of this condition with a variety of approaches ranging from behavior modification to medication. The results have been mixed. What works for one student is often ineffective for another. The result is frustration on the part of both the student and the teacher as well as a pattern of inconsistent student academic achievement. For school districts across the country the reality is that no real viable strategies have proven consistently successful in combating this growing concern.

One major manifestation of this disorder is the fact that students diagnosed with A.D.H.D. often have difficulty in maintaining their focus over a long period of time. As a result, they have problems when trying to complete assigned tasks. This is quite evident in collaborative group work efforts. In group work students are given specific tasks to complete. To be successful all the students in the group must learn to work together to accomplish specific tasks in order to reach set goals and successfully complete the assignment. A.D.H.D. students often lack the sustained focus to contribute meaningfully to these efforts.

A viable alternative solution to this dilemma is to alter the strategy of how tasks are assigned to A.D.H.D. students within these groups. Instead of placing the A.D.H.D. student in one particular group, it would be more beneficial to rotate that student between several groups, giving the student one specific task to accomplish throughout all the various different groups. The assigned task can be as simple as distributing or gathering materials or spot checking to make sure everyone in the group understands the directions. Eventually, as the student gets better at mastering increasing more difficult tasks, more complex ones, such as keeping others on track or translating one specific idea throughout all the groups can be assigned.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Achieving Higher Levels of Success for A.D.H.D. Students Working in Collaborative Groups
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?