Freedom's Advance; Christians Evangelize, Labor to End Slavery in Sudan

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 30, 2007 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Freedom's Advance; Christians Evangelize, Labor to End Slavery in Sudan


Byline: Jen Waters, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Dr. Gloria E. White-Hammond, co-pastor of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Boston, founded My Sister's Keeper in 2002 in an effort to secure peace and justice throughout Sudan.

The nonprofit organization focuses on ministering to women in southern Sudan, she said, but her advocacy work spans the country.

"On the ground in Darfur, it seems like two steps forward and three steps back," said Dr. White-Hammond, 57. "We are still working hard and confident that our labor will not be in vain."

Dr. White-Hammond began working in 2001 with the nonprofit Christian Solidarity International and now serves on the board of its U.S. division. It was through her involvement that she learned more about slavery in Sudan.

"I was naive in that I had not understood that most of those enslaved in Sudan were women and children," Dr. White-Hammond said. "I had a clear sense of calling to be in support of women as they reintegrated into their communities. Initially, our projects were targeted toward returning women. Then we realized that everyone was in a dire situation."

Since 1995, tens of thousands of people from southern Sudan have been bought out of slavery, said John Eibner, chief executive officer of Christian Solidarity International USA.

In the early 1990s, the Dinka people established peace initiatives with their Arab neighbors, allowing for the return of Dinkas enslaved by Arab militias, he said.

"The local Arabs got to go to the south for water during the dry season, January to May, and trade without being attacked," Mr. Eibner said. "In return, the Dinkas expected them not to participate in the war and help facilitate the return of slaves."

Mr. Eibner said Christian Solidarity International supports the local mechanism for the exchange of slaves. Increasingly, slaves are being traded for cattle vaccines rather than Sudanese currency. The vaccines are difficult to access, and the typical price is about $33 per slave.

"The revival of slavery coincided with the outbreak of the civil war in 1983," Mr. Eibner said. "With the January 2005 comprehensive peace agreement, the slave raiding in southern Sudan stopped. There was no economic change that brought it about."

The Arabs take slaves for sex and to work in the field, he said, but mainly as trophies.

"Slavery in Sudan has primarily been a military and political phenomenon, not an economic one," Mr. Eibner said. "There is no great economy that depends on slavery."

Because many of the people enslaved during the raids are still being held captive, Mr.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Freedom's Advance; Christians Evangelize, Labor to End Slavery in Sudan
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.