Videoconferencing Comes of Age

USA TODAY, June 1995 | Go to article overview

Videoconferencing Comes of Age


For some, the vision was born in New York in 1964 at AT&T's World's Fair Pavilion. For many more, it began in the late 1960s with "Star Trek." For a few, it started with the TV cartoon "The Jetsons" in the early 1960s. However it began, the concept of two-way videoconferencing was the central part of a fantasy about how people might conduct business, government, even their social lives, more efficiently in the next century.

The next century, it turns out, has arrived a bit early. Today videoconferencing has become a reality for thousands of businesses and million of individuals. There are more than 25,000 videoconferencing systems operating around the world, and growth approaching 100% per year is projected for the next two years, with total revenues passing $1,000,000,000.

There are many reasons for the rapid expansion of videoconferencing: compression technology, which makes it possible to transmit more information; the continuing decrease in the cost of videoconferencing hardware; and the growth of communications links such as satellites, microwave transmission, and fiber optics. Where videoconferencing systems cost in excess of $50,000 three years ago, they are expected to dip below $10,000 in the near future. As a consequence, dedicated videoconferencing studios are appearing with greater frequency in corporate centers and business service bureaus across the globe.

The post-recession trend towards corporate downsizing and cost containment has resulted in businesses scrutinizing their travel budgets and trimming waste wherever possible. Since videoconferencing can deliver much of the personal contact and intimacy that otherwise requires on-site presence and can save enormous amounts of the time, money, and productivity lost in travel, it has become a much sought after alternative to business travel.

The potential applications of videoconferencing just are beginning to be explored. The first major use has been internal corporate communications, especially in situations where significant overseas initiatives require detailed reporting from operatives in the field.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Videoconferencing Comes of Age
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.