Cardinal Appointments Keep Global North Dominant

By Allen, John L., Jr. | National Catholic Reporter, October 26, 2007 | Go to article overview

Cardinal Appointments Keep Global North Dominant


Allen, John L., Jr., National Catholic Reporter


In naming 23 new cardinals on Oct. 17, including two Americans, Pope Benedict XVI does not seem to have stacked the deck in the body that will elect his successor in any political or theological sense, but he has reinforced the dominance of Europe and North America despite the demographic reality that most Catholics today live in the global South.

The list of new cardinals includes American Archbishops John Foley, a Philadelphia native who has served in the Vatican since 1984, and Daniel DiNardo of Houston, who worked for six years in the Vatican's Congregation for Bishops before being named the bishop of Sioux City, Iowa, in 1997, and moving to Houston in 2004.

DiNardo's nomination was something of a surprise, as most observers had expected the honor to go to Archbishop Donald Wuerl of Washington. Two factors may explain the choice: first, it reflects a shift in Catholic population in the United States away from the East Coast, toward the South and Southwest; second, DiNardo has good connections in Rome and among other American prelates, including Cardinal Justin Rigali of Philadelphia, who was his boss in the Congregation for Bishops for a year.

The 23 new cardinals, including 18 under the age of 80 and thus eligible to vote for the next pope, will be formally inducted into the college in a consistory in Rome on Nov. 24.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Because the College of Cardinals has had the exclusive right to elect Archbishop the pope since 1179, church-watchers always scour new appointments to see if they can detect efforts on behalf of the current pontiff to influence the selection of his successor.

This time around, it's difficult to discern any such attempt. The appointments include men widely seen as strong conservatives, such as German Archbishop Paul Joseph Cordes, president of the Vatican's "Cor Unum" charitable agency, and Polish Archbishop Stanislaw Rylko, president of the Pontifical Council for the Laity, but also figures generally seen as more moderate, such as Foley, Indian Archbishop Oswald Gracias, and Italian Archbishop Angelo Comastri. Two are veteran Vatican diplomats, Archbishops Leonardo Sandri and Giovanni Lajolo, and like diplomats everywhere, they tend to avoid sharply defined positions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cardinal Appointments Keep Global North Dominant
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.