FinanceNet: The Finance Officers' Site on the Internet

By Zorn, Paul | Government Finance Review, June 1995 | Go to article overview

FinanceNet: The Finance Officers' Site on the Internet


Zorn, Paul, Government Finance Review


Currently, all electronic highways lead to the Internet. Millions of people are already on-line, and the number is growing so rapidly that the statistics are outdated even before they are published. Most, if not all, proprietary networks such as CompuServe, America Online, and Prodigy are racing to provide their members with full Internet access. Why? Because the Internet contains an almost unlimited amount of information. The trick, of course, is finding what is needed.

Recently, the GFOA's Government Finance Research Center began exploring ways to provide services to GFOA members through the Internet. As part of this exploration, GFOA staff attended the National Science Foundation's "FinanceNet Summit" in December 1994, to discuss the Internet services that could be provided to state and local governments. The meeting's attendees included representatives of many state and local government organizations, including the International Institute of Municipal Clerks; the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants; the National Association of State Auditors, Comptrollers and Treasurers; the National Association of State Treasurers; and the Municipal Treasurers Association. Also attending were representatives of state and local governments with Internet access, not the least of which was the City of New York's Comptroller's Office, the first state or local government to join FinanceNet.

FinanceNet, growing out of the initiatives developed by Vice President Gore's National Performance Review to reinvent government, is essentially a series of electronic information and communication services provided through the Internet. Its mission is to "innovate and optimize the way governments manage and account for taxpayer resources" by offering electronic information and communication services designed to link finance professionals in government, academia, and private industry. The tools and services provided through FinanceNet are developed and managed by the National Science Foundation, one of the originators of the Internet. These services will grow and change over time as ways are found to improve them. FinanceNet's current services are described in this article.

Electronic Mailing Lists ("Listservers"). Mailing lists offer an easy way for finance officials to request and share information with each other and to alert each other of important news. FinanceNet maintains more than 20 mailing lists on a wide range of topics, including performance measurement, internal controls, cash management, financial training, procurement, and a host of other issues. FinanceNet also maintains a separate listserver for the GFOA, which is used to distribute the "GFOA Gram," a weekly summary of electronic information of interest to GFOA members. Access to the mailing lists is open to anyone with e-mail access to the Internet, including members of CompuServe. To subscribe to the GFOA's listserver, send the following message: subscribe GFOA to the following Internet address: listproc@financenet.gov

Gopher Services. FinanceNet maintains a large document library containing current and archived information on many aspects of federal, state, and local finance. The documents are accessed through a "gopher" menu structure, which organizes the information into related categories. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

FinanceNet: The Finance Officers' Site on the Internet
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.