Most Vulnerable Sectors of Society Will Be the Poor

Cape Times (South Africa), November 13, 2007 | Go to article overview

Most Vulnerable Sectors of Society Will Be the Poor


BYLINE: Tasneem Essop

On THE first anniversary of the Review of the Economics of Climate Change released by Sir Nicholas Stern, it is incumbent on us to take stock of the actions that we have undertaken in response to the Review's key imperative.

To my mind, the key imperative of the Review is the conclusion that it is more economically prudent for governments to commence climate change adaptation and mitigation sooner rather than later.

The longer we delay our climate change response, the greater the socio-economic cost to achieve the same level of adaptation and mitigation.

The government of the United Kingdom and the Western Cape Department of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning have recently signed a two-and-a-half- year Technical Co-operation Agreement to implement a "Clean Energy Governance Programme for the Western Cape Province", to develop a provincial Sustainable Energy Policy and related supportive institutional and regulatory arrangements for the province.

The Department of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning has been working with the South African National Biodiversity Institute's Global Change Unit since 2005, when Dr Guy Midgley led a team of eminent local scientists in a preliminary study to investigate the vulnerability of the Western Cape Province to climate change.

The report by the group of researchers clearly indicated that the Western Cape would be severely impacted by climate change - temperatures warming and precipitation reducing.

It is estimated that the water-poor Western Cape faces reductions of up to 30% in annual runoff by the end of the century.

The report also highlighted that the most vulnerable sectors of society will be the poor, and predicted climate changes will negatively impact on socio-economic development and environmental sustainability during the course of the century.

Thus, we have said that climate change is a poverty issue.

By 2006, my department initiated the development of a comprehensive Climate Change Response Strategy and Action Plan.

The report has reached the final draft stage and it will be finalised for release in Bali next month.

As part of this plan, two programme management units will be established with the aim of building new capacity in Climate Change Response and Sustainable Energy Management.

Many climate change adaptation, mitigation and research projects are already under way within the province but these need to be up-scaled in future and climate change response measures, both in adaptation and mitigation, need to be integrated into key provincial and local government development programmes and projects.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Most Vulnerable Sectors of Society Will Be the Poor
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.