Options on Iran Nukes Are 'Limited,' Bolton Says; Ex-U.N. Envoy Faults 'Failed Diplomacy'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 13, 2007 | Go to article overview

Options on Iran Nukes Are 'Limited,' Bolton Says; Ex-U.N. Envoy Faults 'Failed Diplomacy'


Byline: Jon Ward, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The two remaining options for the U.S. to prevent Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons are to force a regime change or use military force to take out suspected weapons locations, the White House's former representative to the United Nations said yesterday.

"Our options now are, unfortunately, limited," said John R. Bolton, the ex-U.S. ambassador to the United Nations who now faults the Bush administration for "failed diplomacy" toward Iran and North Korea.

During President Bush's first term, Mr. Bolton was a strong White House advocate as the top weapons-control official at the State Department. He served as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations from 2005 to 2006.

Since leaving the post, Mr. Bolton has emerged as one of the Bush administration's toughest critics. He first spoke out publicly last February against a deal with North Korea that he said would only embolden the communist regime to keep pursuing nuclear weapons.

In a new book and in an interview yesterday with The Washington Times, Mr. Bolton blamed what he said is a well-ingrained culture of liberal European-influenced appeasement at the State Department for putting the U.S. in its current position.

Mr. Bolton also said Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice has failed to stand up to the "persistence of the State Department bureaucracy," and that her influence in the White House is so strong that Mr. Bush is not getting independent advice from the National Security Council.

Miss Rice was Mr. Bush's national security adviser before she was named secretary of state. Her former deputy, Stephen J. Hadley, is now national security adviser.

"I think we've got a situation unparalleled since [Henry] Kissinger was secretary of state and held the position of national security adviser at the same time," Mr. Bolton said. "Functionally, it's the same, and it shows Secretary Rice's dominance within policy-making within the administration. …

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