Vocational Education, Work Culture, and the Children of Immigrants in 1930s Bridgeport

By Greenberg, Ivan | Journal of Social History, Fall 2007 | Go to article overview

Vocational Education, Work Culture, and the Children of Immigrants in 1930s Bridgeport


Greenberg, Ivan, Journal of Social History


In 1917, the United States Congress passed the Smith-Hughes Act mandating federal aid for vocational education. The law became an important catalyst for the expansion of vocational schooling throughout industrial America. While in 1918 approximately 122,000 students enrolled in vocational courses nationwide, within a decade student enrollment increased almost five-fold. (1)

The literature on vocational schooling generally stresses national developments and the ideological perspective of reformers, business, and organized labor. Early writers viewed vocational schooling as democratic reform designed to expand the educational system and to provide opportunities for the working class. (2) Revisionist historians of a later period emphasized the function of these schools in aiding business to secure a trained, disciplined, and passive workforce. (3) However, very little still is known about the local history of vocational education, especially the impact of vocational schooling on the student population and working-class culture. As Daniel T. Rodgers and David B. Tyack have asked, "Who enrolled in the new vocational education courses? From what backgrounds did they come? What kinds of vocational courses did they seek out in greatest number? How much of that demand was voluntary, and how much of it coerced?" (4)

This paper addresses some of these questions by focusing on vocational schooling in Bridgeport, Ct., during the 1930s. Bridgeport, a medium-sized city with a population of about 147,000 in 1930, was known as the "Industrial Capital of Connecticut." The industrial sector included both large and small firms, employing about half the local workforce. While Bridgeport sometimes assumed the reputation of being a single industry city geared to munitions and arms production, especially during the two world wars, its industrial base was quite diverse as manufacturers produced some 5,000 different items. Overall, about 500 manufacturing establishments operated at mid-decade and the vast majority of these (89 percent) employed less than 100 workers. Only nineteen firms employed at least 500 workers. As the local city directory boasted, "There is probably no city in the United States that has a more diversified line of industries." (5) Vocational education in Bridgeport took place at what was named the State Trade School, a state-funded, free vocational high school. As we will see, the history of the school, the largest of eleven trade schools in Connecticut, provides insight into changes in craft work and craft culture, the role of business, the aspirations of working-class students, and the changing ethnic composition of the industrial workforce. Additionally, Bridgeport is an interesting setting because the Socialist Party, led by Jasper McLevy, dominated elected city government after 1933. The prominence of skilled workers in urban politics raised expectations that the working class could have a leading voice in local life as Socialists. I highlight the experience of the native-born children of the "New Immigrants," a generation that came of age during the 1930s and dominated school attendance. In New England, this group totaled 38 percent of the population and exceeded 40 percent in such states as Connecticut and Rhode Island. Bridgeport's second generation made up an impressive 45 percent of the city's residents, and much of this group was under twenty-five. (6) This "rising generation" faced changing industrial demands, which often led them to forsake immigrant family advice and spurn the artisan world of their parents in favor of organized school instruction.

The Bridgeport school was founded in 1910, a year after the Connecticut legislature became the nation's first to subsidize free vocational high schools. Initially the school offered training in seven trades, but by the 1930s expanded its instruction to fifteen: auto-repair, auto-screw, carpentry, architectural drafting, dressmaking, electrical work, foundry work, machine trades, masonry, painting, paperhanging, wood pattern making, plumbing, composition and presswork printing, and welding. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Vocational Education, Work Culture, and the Children of Immigrants in 1930s Bridgeport
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.