Shooting for Perfection; Fox 5 Cameraman Has Eyes Peeled for the Best Footage

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 16, 2007 | Go to article overview

Shooting for Perfection; Fox 5 Cameraman Has Eyes Peeled for the Best Footage


Byline: Kara Rowland, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Doug Wilkes jumps into the open passenger window of an SUV and aims his 50-pound camera backward along Rock Creek Parkway.

The veteran WTTG-TV cameraman is recording the perennial traffic jam on the scenic Northwest road for a story with reporter Beth Parker. He is hanging out the window of the Fox 5 vehicle, looking for the perfect shot.

After interviewing frustrated motorists in their cars, the team spots two women on their lunch break walking along the trail. Mr. Wilkes sprints ahead to catch the pair moving against the gridlock in the background.

"That'll be the set-up shot. That's the shot I was waiting for," he says.

Mr. Wilkes, 50, has worked at the D.C. Fox affiliate since 1983 and has been in the TV news business even longer. The D.C. resident is a household name among the city's TV crews. He has racked up 12 Emmys, been named White House Television Photographer of the year four times and, most recently, won a Silver Circle award from the local chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences honoring his 25 years in the business.

"On day one, I knew this was my calling," Mr. Wilkes says. "Not knowing what your day was going to be, then the mad rush to get it on the air... and then the show's over and you got it all on It was very satisfying. And then it starts all over the next day."

Mr. Wilkes got started in the news business by chance. As a student at Allegheny College, he was told he was taking too few credits to dive for the swim team. Rather than sign up for another course, he applied for an internship at the CBS affiliate in Erie, Pa., which counted as class credit.

After he graduated, he took a job as a radio disc jockey, but he kept in touch with Channel 35 in Erie, eventually making his way back as a reporter. After about a year and a half, Mr. Wilkes realized he was a better cameraman than a reporter, and took a job in Buffalo, N.Y., as a shooter/editor. One year later, he arrived at WTTG.

"You're documenting things that are important to people's lives," he says. "What could be better than this?"

On a typical day, Mr. Wilkes is in the office well before his 9 a.m. weekday shift begins, preparing his gear. He checks a white board in the newsroom to see what his assignment is and with which reporter he'll be working.

Typically, Mr. Wilkes says, a news story might revolve around some kind of planned event, and the reporter decides what other shots or interviews - be it "stand-ups" with a source or "man on the street" - are needed to supplement the story. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Shooting for Perfection; Fox 5 Cameraman Has Eyes Peeled for the Best Footage
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.