Depression in Children; "Let Not Another's Disobedience to Nature Become an Ill to You;" Epictetus, (A.D. C. 50-C. 138), Stoic Philosopher That We Ought Not to Be Affected by Things Not in Our Own Power. Chap. Xxiv

Manila Bulletin, November 18, 2007 | Go to article overview

Depression in Children; "Let Not Another's Disobedience to Nature Become an Ill to You;" Epictetus, (A.D. C. 50-C. 138), Stoic Philosopher That We Ought Not to Be Affected by Things Not in Our Own Power. Chap. Xxiv


Byline: DR. BRIX PUJALTE

WOULD it have made a difference if Mariannet Amper (suicide@12 years old) read Epictetus? The Roman slave turned freedman turned Stoic philosopher wrote centuries ago: "For you were not born to be depressed and unhappy with others, but to be happy with them. And if any is unhappy, remember that he is so for himself; for God made all men to enjoy felicity and peace." But I suspect Mariannet was far too depressed (and hungry). Suicide was her action ("disobedience to Nature").

Symptoms of depression. The cut-off period between sadness and depression in the textbooks is two weeks. This is to say that mere sadness, disappointment; a somber mood should last no longer than two weeks. Normal people somehow cope and snap out it. The link between depression and suicide is strong. But before our two Davao politicians mow each other down, let us stress that depression is genetic, due to a brain chemical imbalance but yes, triggered by personal crisis. The point here is that if depression is because of poverty or misfortunes alone, then we'd have millions of Filipinos hanging themselves or jumping from buildings or walking in front of speeding buses. Major depression throws a person out of kilter and the symptoms, according to familydoctor.org are:

* No interest in things that used to be pleasurable

* Feeling sad or empty

* Crying easily or crying for no reason

* Feeling slowed down or feeling restless and unable to sit still

* Weight gain or weight loss

* Thoughts about death or suicide

* Trouble thinking, recalling things, or on focusing on what needs to be done

* Problems sleeping, especially in the early morning or wanting to sleep all the time

* Feeling tired all the time

* Feeling emotionally numb, sometimes to the point of not being able to cry

Depression in children. The symptoms above are those seen in adults. Mental health professionals admit that diagnosing depression in children is more difficult. The Mayo Clinic has nevertheless identified some additional signs and symptoms in kids. A preschooler (defined as between 3 and 5 years old) may be listless, has decreased interest in playing and cries easily and more often than usual.

A depressed elementary school child may be listless and moody, more irritable than usual, looks sad, easily discouraged, complains of boredom, has difficulty in school work and talks about death. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Depression in Children; "Let Not Another's Disobedience to Nature Become an Ill to You;" Epictetus, (A.D. C. 50-C. 138), Stoic Philosopher That We Ought Not to Be Affected by Things Not in Our Own Power. Chap. Xxiv
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.