Still Fighting Communism

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 21, 2007 | Go to article overview

Still Fighting Communism


Byline: James Morrison, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Still fighting communism

A member of the Hungarian parliament, a Vietnamese dissident and a Republican congressman from California whose district stretches along the scenic coastline from Orange County to parts of Los Angeles, including the famed "Surf City," Huntington Beach - at first glance they might seem to have little in common.

However, all three, in their own ways, fought against communism, and a Washington institution dedicated to making the world remember that struggle honored them for their efforts.

Janos Horvath, tortured by Nazis and imprisoned by Hungarian communists; Tran Van Ba, executed by Vietnamese communists; and Dana Rohrabacher, a former speechwriter for President Reagan who has supported anti-communist movements from the White House to Congress, are this year's recipients of the Truman-Reagan Medal of Freedom from the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation.

Foundation Chairman Lee Edwards posed the rhetorical question: Why remind people of the crimes of communism 16 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union?

"You and I know that the Cold War ended in victory because of the great sacrifices in blood and treasure made by the citizens of the free world," Mr. Edwards told guests at the awards ceremony at the Hungarian Embassy last week.

"But many of our children are being taught that communism was never a threat and its collapse was inevitable. You and I know that communism is responsible for the deaths of tens of millions of innocent people."

He added, "Communism is dead? Ask the 1.4 billion people who live, and not by their choice, in China, Cuba, Vietnam, North Korea and Laos. The truth is that communism is responsible for a global holocaust that has lasted for nearly a century, and we are determined to keep telling that truth."

Mr. Horvath, 86, battled Nazis in World War II as a member of the student resistance. He was arrested, tortured and sentenced to death in December 1944.

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