Keycorp Taps Executive from Dun & Bradstreet as Its Technology Czar

By Marjanovic, Steven | American Banker, August 10, 1995 | Go to article overview

Keycorp Taps Executive from Dun & Bradstreet as Its Technology Czar


Marjanovic, Steven, American Banker


Robert C. Meltzer has been named executive vice president and chief technology officer for Key Services Corp., a unit of Keycorp, Cleveland.

Mr. Meltzer, 48, who was hired away from Dun & Bradstreet Information Services of Murray Hill, N.J., where he also held the title of chief technology officer. Mr. Meltzer's new duties had been overseen by Allen J. Gula Jr., Key Service's chairman and chief executive officer.

"Bob brings a wealth of talent and achievement to our team," Mr. Gula said. "Bob's mandate is to take a good organization and make it world class."

Key Services Corp. is the systems and operations unit for the $67.5 billion-asset bank. As it exists today, the unit is an amalgam of the technology divisions of several banks acquired by Key. The most significant of the recent acquisitions was the 1994 Society Corp. deal.

Key Services provides information systems support and other technology to about 1,400 branch and affiliate offices in 25 states.

Mr. Gula said that several of Keycorp's systems and data centers had been headed by a variety of bank officials. But as the bank spread out, "we really needed a leader in the technology area again, and so we consolidated the job. …

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Keycorp Taps Executive from Dun & Bradstreet as Its Technology Czar
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