She Always Wanted to Be a Hairdresser, but the Closest Nurse Nia Pritchard Ever Got to It Is Writing a Book about a Very Special Crimper. Here She Tells How More Than Just A Hairdresser Came About

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), November 24, 2007 | Go to article overview

She Always Wanted to Be a Hairdresser, but the Closest Nurse Nia Pritchard Ever Got to It Is Writing a Book about a Very Special Crimper. Here She Tells How More Than Just A Hairdresser Came About


Byline: By Nia Pritchard

It started out as a bit of a hobby. Never did I think it was the kind of thing that would eventually be important enough to have me writing about how I go about doing it in a newspaper.

It all began about four years ago. I was busy looking after my family, my husband and our three daughters and I was working part time as a nurse.

I'd had a nursing article published and thought to myself, 'I wonder if I can write something a bit more fun?'

I've met many great characters over my 20-year nursing career and heard lots of interesting and funny stories. I wondered if I could bring all this together and write a story.

When I was younger I wanted to be a hairdresser and amongst my family and close friends I'm thought to be a bit nosey.

So I thought, hey, why not combine all that together as one? So that's how the hairdresser-cum-detective story line came about in my book, More Than Just a Hairdresser. Simple, eh?

After deciding this was what I was going to write about, I then I had to think of a location.

Where could this story be set? Liverpool seemed the obvious place as it's famed for its warm hearted humorous people.

It was a priority that the story be funny and one that women could relate to. I also wanted to write something that could be easily picked up and the reader could jump straight back into the plot. So that's why I decided to go for a daily diary entry type of format.

Then came the characters, the biggest challenge of all to get right.

I've met lots and lots of fantastic characters over the years, both in my nursing career and to some degree my social life.

When it came to making up the characters and the plot I thought back over the years to the real life people I'd met. By the end, people in the book seemed to be made up of two or three real life characters with maybe a few extra bits or other people I know thrown in to the mix. That's a writer's right, I think.

I did the same with the story lines, either exaggerating or watering down things that I've heard.

I set about writing it in between my "real" work and looking after my family, all the time getting ideas from eavesdropping! I did a lot of listening and writing and nine months later, the first part of the book was done.

But what to do next? I read it back a few times and thought it wasn't bad, certainly something that I would be interested in picking up and reading myself.

How, though, do you get a book published?

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She Always Wanted to Be a Hairdresser, but the Closest Nurse Nia Pritchard Ever Got to It Is Writing a Book about a Very Special Crimper. Here She Tells How More Than Just A Hairdresser Came About
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