Travel: NEVADA'S CANYON SKYWALK IS A GRAND DAY OUT; Liz Cowan Braves a 4000ft Drop during Action-Packed Trip to Vegas

Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), December 2, 2007 | Go to article overview

Travel: NEVADA'S CANYON SKYWALK IS A GRAND DAY OUT; Liz Cowan Braves a 4000ft Drop during Action-Packed Trip to Vegas


I've always been a thrill seeker but my hubby Tam would have been handed the part of the cowardly lion in The Wizard Of Oz without having to audition.

This was confirmed in Las Vegas during a trip to the Skywalk, a glass, horseshoe-shaped walkway suspended 4000ft above the Grand Canyon.

The first step on to the glass is a bottom-clenching experience and as we climbed the steps towards it Tam shoved me ahead declaring: "You go first."

The Skywalk isn't for the fainthearted and the feeling of having nothing between you and that drop except glass is quite unnerving.

But once you are out there it feels like you are floating and the views of Eagle Point are truly spectacular.

The Hualapai Indians own the land and want to preserve its natural beauty.

So if you really want to crank the thrill to the next level a wander over to the edge of the Canyon is a must.

There are no fences or rails, just you, rock and a sheer drop. If that doesn't get the adrenaline pumping nothing will.

We booked our Canyon extravaganza with Maverick helicopters.

The 6am pick-up was a shock to the system but appreciated when Paul our pilot explained that temperatures can hit 120 degrees by mid-afternoon in the Nevada desert.

It takes about 45 minutes to get from the famous Strip and as they fly you below the rim of the Canyon the jaw-dropping spectacle appearing in front of you is only slightly tarnished by the Magnificent Seven blasting through your headset. Cheeeeesy!

Our first stop was at the base of the Canyon, where you get a picnic and a glass of champagne. It was like something straight out of a western as crows the size of puppies gathered waiting for any titbits.

This was the fourth year Tam and I have spent our summer hols in Nevada and everyone says the same thing: "We didn't realise you were gamblers."

We aren't. While a few hours in the casino can be fun there is much more to this state than slot machines.

We stayed at the Bellagio, featured in Ocean's 11, and even though we didn't run into Brad Pitt or George Clooney, I loved it.

Choosing from the 14 restaurants isn't easy but Fix was one of our favourites.

Despite only being a few feet away from the casino floor you could not enjoy a much more intimate setting.

The hotel also has five pools and you can book an exclusive cabana. The padded sunbeds and cooling misters that spray you are fantastic, especially as the temperature hit 110F every day.

But if poolside posing isn't your thing, Vegas has loads more. We opted for a Pink Jeep tour to take us to Hoover Dam.

There were only six of us and our guide Bob drove us through Boulder City, where it is still illegal to gamble. His history lesson of the Dam was also brilliant.

But the one story that had us hooked was about the Hoover Dam dog, who is buried in the structure. He belonged to the workmen but died following a tragic accident involving a lorry. …

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