And All Because the Lady Loves. Housework

Daily Mail (London), December 3, 2007 | Go to article overview

And All Because the Lady Loves. Housework


WOMENS lib has been relegated to the back of the cleaning closet when itcomes to domestic chores with Irish women spending twice asmuch time on housework as their European counterparts.

Meanwhile, Irish men are just as happy to lounge on the sofa. A study, by theNorwegian universities of Stavanger and Bergen has found that a gleaming houseis a high priority for Irish women, who clock up almost 32 hours a week ofhousework.

This compares with a menial 12 hours a week by French women, and between 13.5and 14 hours for British and U.S. women.

Only Chilean and Brazilian women can surpass the Irish, with Chilean womenputting in a stag-gering 38 hours a week a full-time job in itself.

Thestudyanalysedresponses from almost 18,000 couples aged 25 to 65 in 34 countries on how muchtime they spend cooking, washing, tidying up and shopping.

Womeninthestudyspendan average of 20 hours and 48 minutesaweekoncookingand householdwork,while men on average spend just seven hours and 48 minutes on those duties.

ThehouseholdeffortsofIrish menfolk are little better than Mr European Average, with Irish menspending a measly eight hours 30 minutes on such tasks.

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