Analysis; Religion in Key US Campaign

Manila Bulletin, December 9, 2007 | Go to article overview

Analysis; Religion in Key US Campaign


Byline: TONY CZUCZKA Deutsche Presse Agentur

WASHINGTON (dpa) -- Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney sought Thursday to dampen questions about his Mormon faith, saying he would keep his religion out of the White House if elected in 2008.

But the millionaire businessman and former Massachusetts governor insisted that religion deserved a prominent place in US public life and drew a contrast with Europe, where he said churches are "so grand -- and so empty."

Romney's faith is a campaign issue in part because of Mormons' strict conservative social values, their view that other Christians have errant beliefs, and tricky relations with Jews.

In a speech in Texas that evoked the driving force of religion in US history and public life, Romney said he would separate his faith from the presidency if he wins the Republican nomination next summer and the presidential election in November.

"Let me assure you that no authorities of my church, or of any other church for that matter, will ever exert influence on presidential decisions," he told supporters at the presidential library of George H W Bush, the current president's father.

"I will serve no one religion, no one group, no one cause and no one interest," Romney said. He expressed respect for other religions, including Jews and Muslims.

Drawing a parallel to his own controversy, Romney recalled a famous speech by John F Kennedy aimed at dispelling concerns about his Catholic faith before he won the presidency in 1960.

And he said some civilrights activists were going too far in pushing for greater church-state separation in the US, a nation led by a born-again evangelical Christian - President George W. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Analysis; Religion in Key US Campaign
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.