Hillary Clinton

By Hession, Gregory A. | The New American, December 10, 2007 | Go to article overview
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Hillary Clinton


Hession, Gregory A., The New American


"Being pro-choice is trusting the individual to make the right decision for herself and her family, and not entrusting that decision to anyone wearing the authority of government."--H. Clinton

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Hillary Clinton is perhaps the best known of the 2008 presidential candidates, at once the most fervently admired by supporters, and most disdained by detractors.

Most Americans know where Senator Clinton stands on the issues, and many of them like those stands. Her popularity comes from a promise to make socialism work.

First, some history: Hillary Rodham was born in 1947, and grew up as a "Goldwater Republican" in a Chicago suburb, becoming a radical feminist by her senior year at Wellesley College. Yale Law School followed, after which she practiced law with a number of organizations.

Miss Rodham became Hillary Rodham Clinton in 1975 and went to Arkansas, where daughter Chelsea was born. When Bill became governor of Arkansas in 1979, she was First Lady until 1992 (with one two-year interruption), after which she became First Lady of the United States.

In the White House, she assumed a significant policy role, once declaiming, "We are the president." Scandals plagued her entire "co-presidency," including improprieties in fundraising and hiring/firing, sweetheart deals for relatives, and a plethora of Arkansas business scares including the notorious Whitewater scandal.

Mrs. Clinton has been a U.S. senator from New York since 2001. Now, Senator Clinton's main campaign theme is that the middle class is being squeezed and that government should help. Her April 13, 2007 speech is typical, demurely asserting that "we know that government isn't the answer to all our problems," but then advocating that government take over healthcare, education, early childhood care, scientific research, job training, mortgages, retirement income, energy policy, labor relations, and more. She also favors universal intervention by social workers in families, abortion, removal and adoption of children, and the loss of gun rights. Senator Clinton states her government would be a "partner for progress," not a tyranny. However, under a Clinton presidency, the government would be a non-optional "partner for progress" with each citizen in every aspect of family and business life.

Political adaptation is Senator Clinton's strength. Her speeches are well written and tailored for local audiences.

Her public delivery is flawless, if sometimes grating.

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