Not Just a Midwest LOS Company: Southfield, Michigan-Based Mortgage Builder Software Inc. Specializes in Building Loan Origination Technology. It Targets Small to Midsized Lenders, and Is Gaining More and More Customers-Even Some Linux Devotees

By Bergsman, Steve | Mortgage Banking, December 2007 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Not Just a Midwest LOS Company: Southfield, Michigan-Based Mortgage Builder Software Inc. Specializes in Building Loan Origination Technology. It Targets Small to Midsized Lenders, and Is Gaining More and More Customers-Even Some Linux Devotees


Bergsman, Steve, Mortgage Banking


McClair Mortgage Corporation, Flint, Michigan, does things differently. It is one of the few independent mortgage brokers in the country functioning on Linux, a Unix-like computer operating system, instead of Microsoft[R] Windows[R], the most universal of operating systems. [??] To be so independent-minded, McClair needed to find loan origination software that could operate on Linux. It turned to a cross-state neighbor--Mortgage Builder Software Inc., Southfield, Michigan. [??] It's not that Mortgage Builder, a provider of loan origination system (LOS) software solutions, produces a Linux product. No, its technology is quintessentially Windows--but because a number of its customers do use Linux, the company created a way to effortlessly port its software system to Linux. [??] "Our system was built on the Microsoft platform," says Keven Smith, president of Mortgage Builder, "yet customers would come to me and say, 'I want to run on Unix or Linux, can you do that?'"

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Obviously, that question was asked of other technology providers as well, but as Smith explains, the problem with other LOS platforms was that creating something that would run on Linux would mean an expensive and time-consuming rewrite of their existing systems. Many providers couldn't do it, leaving the Linux-system customers with the option to seek help elsewhere or switch to Windows.

That's not an easy choice, as Linux operators really like to use Linux. "We find Linux a much more stable environment to operate in," says John O'Leary, operations manager for McClair Mortgage. "We don't have as much downtime on the servers as with a Windows operating system. There is a lot more flexibility as far as development, according to our IT [information technology] staff and it is less expensive. We have guys on staff who understand Linux. It was their choice," adds O'Leary.

In 2003, McClair Mortgage opted to use Mortgage Builder's LOS because it could port its technology over to a Unix-based operating system, such as Linux, with what Smith calls "minimal effort." And that's exactly what Mortgage Builder did for McClair Mortgage, a mortgage banking firm that does both prime and subprime lending.

"Our software runs seamlessly on Unix, Linux and Microsoft-based systems," says Smith. "This gives customers such as McClair Mortgage the option to use its existing Linux setup instead of purchasing costly new servers just to run their LOS."

McClair Mortgage, which in 2007 only did business in a selection of "M" states--Michigan, Missouri and Minnesota--will do about 1,500 loans this year, or about $120 million in volume, and with very little in the way of glitches from its operating system.

"Since using Mortgage Builder, operations have gone very smoothly," says O'Leary. "About every two years we look at the market to see what is available, and then decide if we are still doing the right thing. We are still doing the right thing."

Because Linux-minded companies like McClair Mortgage use, or at least consider, Mortgage Builder, the company sometimes gets thought of as being Linux-based, which, as noted, is not at all correct. In fact, only about 2 percent of Mortgage Builder's customers use Linux.

It's all about customer service, says Smith. "If a customer comes to us and says, 'We would love to run Mortgage Builder on Linux,' I don't want to say to the customer, 'We don't run on Linux.' The Linux product is not the biggest seller for us, but we give them that service; we give them the flexibility to run on the operating system of their choice."

A break-out company

Officially, Mortgage Builder was born in 1998. Its origins, however, are much older.

Back in 1977, Glenn Liebowitz founded Glenn Computer Corporation to provide technology to mortgage servicers. That company eventually morphed into Southfield, Michigan-based GCC Servicing Systems, a mortgage servicing technology and service provider.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Not Just a Midwest LOS Company: Southfield, Michigan-Based Mortgage Builder Software Inc. Specializes in Building Loan Origination Technology. It Targets Small to Midsized Lenders, and Is Gaining More and More Customers-Even Some Linux Devotees
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?