Younger, Healthier in 2008; "I Am of a Healthy Long Lived Race, and Our Minds Improve with Age." - William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish Poet. Letter, June 24, 1935. the Letters of W.B. Yeats, Ed. Allan Wade (1954)

Manila Bulletin, January 6, 2008 | Go to article overview

Younger, Healthier in 2008; "I Am of a Healthy Long Lived Race, and Our Minds Improve with Age." - William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish Poet. Letter, June 24, 1935. the Letters of W.B. Yeats, Ed. Allan Wade (1954)


Byline: DR. BRIX PUJALTE

LET'S start the trivia overload for 2008 with a quick check of Filipino life expectancy. And it is? 72.5 years for women and 67.8 years for men. Now that may not mean much if you know that the Japanese, on the average, live up to 82.3 years or that our ASEAN neighbor Singaporeans enjoy their Hainanese chicken rice until 78.8 years. But consider that when Martial Law (1972) was declared, the average Filipino life expectancy was just 58.1 years (source: UNDP statistics).

Your Real Age please? Of course, it's not just a numbers game. Who would want to live to a 100 blind, deaf, and incontinent two ways? The assumption is we all would like to age superbly like well-kept wine. After all, who enjoys drinking vinegar? For 2008, I've sent some friends and relatives a link to a health website (http://www.realage.com) that actually computes one's real age (vs. chronological age). The idea here is that "real age" is a measure of how our organs and systems are working in response to care (or abuse). Chronological age is simply calendar age. There usually is a difference between the two. Surely everyone knows that you can feel, think, and act younger or older than your actual age.

Growing Younger. Aside from taking the "real age" test, the website also lists eleven other ways to grow younger (and by how much!). Here they are:

1. Take your vitamins. Specifically - Vitamin C (1,200mg a day), Vitamin E (400 IU/day), Vitamin D (400-600 IU/day), Vitamin B6 (6 mg/day) Folate (400 mcg/day) and minerals Calcium (1,000-1,200 mg/day). Regularly taking vitamins can subtract 6 years from your real age.

2. Stop smoking. Also avoid second-hand smoke because smoking adds 8 years to your real age.

3. Monitor blood pressure. This is a direct move against silent, diabolical hypertension. A person with low blood pressure (115/75 mmHg) can be as much as 25 years younger than someone with a BP of greater than 160/90 mmHg.

4. Reduce stress. Stress steals youth - that much is plain. By how much? 30 years. So maybe 2008 is the year to make more friends, fewer enemies or better yet, turn enemies into friends and keep friends from becoming enemies. Strong social networks, aside from stress-reduction techniques; e.g. relaxation (not alcohol-induced!), prayer and meditation, exercise, sex (usually of the monogamous type) are popular choices.

5. Floss your teeth. Every day. A dirty mouth - literally - has a high correlation with coronary heart disease. …

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Younger, Healthier in 2008; "I Am of a Healthy Long Lived Race, and Our Minds Improve with Age." - William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish Poet. Letter, June 24, 1935. the Letters of W.B. Yeats, Ed. Allan Wade (1954)
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