Lived Experience of Interracial Dialogue on Race: Proclivity to Participate

By Willow, Rebecca A. | Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, January 2008 | Go to article overview

Lived Experience of Interracial Dialogue on Race: Proclivity to Participate


Willow, Rebecca A., Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development


The author conducted a qualitative inquiry of individuals' proclivity to participate in interracial dialogues. Lived experience of 20 participants in a race study circle yielded the overarching themes of education, self-reflection, advanced empathy, moral consciousness, universality, racial identity development, and social interest. Implications for research and recommendations for counselor education are discussed.

La autora Ilevaron a cabo una investigacion cualitativa sobre la propension de individuos a participar en dialogos interraciales. La experiencia vivida de 20 participantes en un circulo de estudio sobre raza dio como resultado los temas omnimodos de educacion, autorreflexion, empatia avanzada, conciencia moral, universalidad, desarrollo de la identidad racial e interns social. Se discuten las implicaciones para la investigacion, asi como recomendaciones para la educacion de los consejeros.

Since the origins of the United States, race relations remain, a nationdefining source of conflict. Locke and Kiselica (1999) stated," The topic of racism is one of the most emotionally charged subjects of our time (p. 80). Social scientists concur that a key to racial healing involves meaningful dialogue among racial groups (Dalton, 1995; Tatum, 1997). Kivel (1996) said, "Talking about racism lessens its power [and] ... allows us to do something about it" (p. 95). According to these scholars, interracial dialogue is a tool that can reduce prejudice; however, such dialogues are not commonly practiced.

The need to address issues of race and racial prejudice within counselor education and supervision has become the subject of discourse among authors interested in multicultural education (Roysircar, Gard, Hubbell, & Ortega, 2005; Toporek, Ortega-Villalobos, & Pope-Davis, 2004). Generally, counselors and counselor educators, much like the American population as a whole, are not comfortable in engaging in interracial discussions on race or race-related issues (D'Andrea & Daniels, 1999). There is a paucity of professional literature that specifically focuses on the propensity to engage in interracial dialogues. One recent study cited particular life experiences of individuals as stimulating an interest in Black-Jewish dialogue (Schlosser, Talleyrand, Lyons, & Baker, 2007). Abu-Nimer (1999) evaluated encounter programs involving Arab-Jewish dialogues in Israel, which were designed for conflict resolution and change. Abu-Nimer examined the goals of participants in engaging in this type of dialogue and the impact of a political context on the encounter models.

The utility of interracial dialogues on race as a personal and professional development tool for counselors is supported by multiple theoreticians. Allport's (1954/1979) seminal work suggested that interracial contact promoted prejudice reduction, especially when participants share (a) a common goal, (b) equal status, (c) intergroup cooperation, and (d) the support of authorities. Healey (1997) and Pettigrew (1998) suggested other factors that contribute to prejudice reduction during interracial contact. In addition, Helms (1990) suggested that interracial contact and dialogue promote racial identity development. Recent focus on social justice and advocacy in the counseling field highlights engagement with people who are different as a way to build empathy, morality, and the promotion of prosocial activism as well as taking action to reduce social problems such as racism (Kiselica & Robinson, 2001). Effective counselor training strategies include opportunities for interaction with peers from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds (Coleman, 2006; Roysircar, 2004; Toporek et at., 2004). Roysircar et al. (2005) demonstrated that community-based interethnic and cross-cultural conversations can promote the development of multicultural competencies in counselor trainees. Others suggested that the use of interracial dialogue as a tool for healing for adversarial parties is consistent with counselors' commitment to multiculturalism (e.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lived Experience of Interracial Dialogue on Race: Proclivity to Participate
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.