Law May Be with Breakaways; Va. Official Weighs in against Episcopal Church

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 12, 2008 | Go to article overview

Law May Be with Breakaways; Va. Official Weighs in against Episcopal Church


Byline: Julia Duin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Virginia's attorney general is defending the right of 11 conservative Anglican parishes to use the state's Civil War-era "division statute" to leave the Episcopal Church while retaining millions of dollars in assets and property.

Attorney General Bob McDonnell's motion to intervene is a significant setback to the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Virginia, which have said secular courts have no place in resolving the property dispute - the largest in the church's history.

Mr. McDonnell, a Roman Catholic who is planning a run for governor in 2009, said state law is on the side of the 11 churches, now with the Convocation of Anglicans in North America (CANA).

CANA's case relies heavily on the state's division statute, known as "57-9" because of the section of the state code in which it falls. The statute says that if the majority of a congregation's members decide to leave the parent denomination, that congregation can retain the church's property. In December 2006 and January 2007, the majority of members in all 11 congregations scattered across several counties voted to leave.

"CANA's interpretation of 57-9 is constitutionally sound,"

Mr. McDonnell wrote in his statement, dated Thursday. "As a matter of federal constitutional law, the Episcopal Church is simply wrong. The [state] constitution does not require that local church property disputes be resolved by deferring to national and regional church leaders."

Although the First Amendment drastically limits a court's role in settling intrachurch disputes, the state can intervene as long as the case does not involve doctrine, ritual, liturgy or tenets of the faith, he wrote.

Mr. McDonnell's 26-page motion cited Virginia Supreme Court and U.S. Supreme Court rulings.

Lawyers for the diocese and the Episcopal Church said during a four-day hearing in November before Circuit Judge Randy I. …

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Law May Be with Breakaways; Va. Official Weighs in against Episcopal Church
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