The World of Paperbacks

Contemporary Review, Autumn 2007 | Go to article overview

The World of Paperbacks


PIMLICO has brought out a wide range of new titles. On the biographical front we have Lauro Martines' Scourge and Fire: Savonarola and Renaissance Italy ([pounds sterling]8.99) and Prof. Frederick Brown's highly praised Flaubert: A Life ([pounds sterling]14.99) which sets the career of the controversial novelist against nineteenth century French society. New history titles include Ross King's The Judgement of Paris: The Revolutionary Decade That Gave the World Impressionism ([pounds sterling]8.99), an examination of the years between 1863 and 1874 which saw the arrival of the Impressionists on the Parisian stage, Robert and Isabelle Tombs' That Sweet Enemy: The French and the British from the Sun King to the Present ([pounds sterling]12.99), a long look at one of the oldest love-hate relationships in modern history, Ian Mortimer's The Perfect King: The Life of Edward III Father of the English Nation ([pounds sterling]8.99), the first really detailed and balanced look at the victor of Crecy, Patrick Dillon's The Last Revolution: 1688 and the Creation of the Modern World ([pounds sterling]8.99), a well written account of the events that left James II an exile in France and William and Mary on the throne, and last but not least, Isaiah Berlin's Political Ideas in the Romantic Age: Their Rise and Influence on Modern Thought ([pounds sterling]14.00), an edition of Berlin's unpublished study (originally prepared for lectures) put together by Henry Hardy and Joshua L. Cherniss.

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS has released two new paperback editions in their impressive series, The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism which will be welcomed by those for whom the hardback series is too expensive. The first is Volume 5 Romanticism edited by Marshall Brown ([pounds sterling]19.99). Its seventeen essays, from an international panel of experts, show how many of the 'presuppositions and practices that prevail in contemporary aesthetics and literary criticism' can be traced to the Romantic period. The second new title is Volume 9: Twentieth-Century Historical, Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives edited by Christa Knellwolf, Christopher Norris and Jessica Osborn ([pounds sterling]19.99). This volume sets out to survey the development of literary criticism in the last century and has thirty essays divided into nine sections: History, Marxism and Post-Marxism, From Cultural Poetics to Cultural Studies, Psychoanalytic Approaches, Gender and Sexuality, Colonialism and Post-Coloniality, Nation and Race, Modernity and Postmodernism, Philosophy, Aesthetics and Literary Criticism, and Interdisciplinary Approaches. Also from Cambridge we have Robert J. Lieber's The American Era: Power and Strategy for the 21st Century ([pounds sterling]14.99) in which the author has included a new postscript which examines the US's foreign policy after the Iraq fiasco.

From FABER AND FABER we have John Fuller's W.H. Auden: A Commentary ([pounds sterling]22.50). This title was first published in 1998 and is being reissued to mark the centenary of Auden's birth. It is a revision and expansion of the author's Reader's Guide to Auden, published in 1970 and covers all his works. Students of Auden's works will appreciate the new paperback format.

Among new titles from VINTAGE we have two historical titles: Ruth Scurr's Fatal Purity: Robespiere and the French Revolution ([pounds sterling]8.99) which tries to explain the peculiar evil that results from the intellectual who is involved in revolutionary politics, and Stella Tillyard's A Royal Affair: George III and His Troublesome Siblings ([pounds sterling]8.99) which got a mixed review in this journal but is at its best when describing the bizarre marriage of George Ill's sister, Caroline, to King Christian of Denmark.

PROFILE BOOKS, as part of its Wonders of the World series, has brought out a paperback edition of Gavin Stamp's The Memorial to the Missing of the Somme ([pounds sterling]8. …

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