Students Hone Decision Skills

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), January 17, 2008 | Go to article overview

Students Hone Decision Skills


Byline: TEAM SPRINGFIELD By Jeff DeFranco For The Register-Guard

Good judgment is hard to teach, but a new evening class offered by the Springfield School District is providing students with new avenues for learning real-world skills.

Juniors and seniors in the school district's Talented and Gifted program have been invited to participate in the "Decision-Making Techniques" class, led by district Superintendent Nancy Golden.

"Despite the complexity and number of difficult decisions students are faced with every day, many are never taught how to make good decisions," Golden says. "This class will show them the steps involved in making a sound decision."

The idea is that making better choices improves the likelihood of favorable outcomes. The 10-week course gives students tools that they can use to make those choices.

Students will learn a decision-making model they can use to evaluate the possible consequences of any decision. And they will learn how their values affect the choices they make.

The decision-making model is part of the curriculum designed by the nonprofit Decision Education Foundation, an organization with ties to Stanford University that is dedicated to improving the lives of young people by improving the quality of their decisions. Golden is on the advisory board of the foundation, which was founded in 2001 as an offshoot of a company experienced in improving the decision-making skills of Fortune 500 companies. The foundation now works with schools across the country to implement the same kind of decision-making models into their curricula.

As DEF Program Director Chris Spetzler puts it, the foundation's curriculum provides youth with a proven framework to take control of their lives and proactively work toward their goals. …

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