Real Truth Behind Demon Barber of Fleet Street; Books ANONYMOUS Sweeney Todd or the String of Pearls (Wordsworth Editions, Pounds 2.99)

Sunday Mercury (Birmingham, England), January 20, 2008 | Go to article overview

Real Truth Behind Demon Barber of Fleet Street; Books ANONYMOUS Sweeney Todd or the String of Pearls (Wordsworth Editions, Pounds 2.99)


Byline: by Lorne Jackson

SWEENEY Todd, the demon barber of Fleet Street, was known for his exuberant way with a razor.

A close shave with this fictional fiend usually turned into a close shave with death.

In other words, he was a notorious hack.

The same could be said about the man behind the legend.

Edward Lloyd published the String Of Pearls, the 1847 tale where Sweeney first appears as a protagonist.

This was the era of Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins and the Brontes.

But Todd wasn't created to stand a chance of literary immortality.

Lloyd - a dodgy dude, indeed - would have been shocked that his villain had a future as a near mythical character.

When he first published Sweeney's exploits, there was no grander motive than to turn a quick buck.

Yet this month, the demon barber resurfaces on the big screen, in director Tim Burton's musical epic, Sweeney Todd, starring Johnny Depp.

Now the original version of the story has been re-published.

Helen Trayler, Managing Director of Wordsworth Editions, who has undertaken the enterprise says: "When I was looking for ideas for a new series, it occurred to me that a mystery and supernatural theme would give us the opportunity to publish long forgotten classics of the genre.

"The Victorians were great fans of supernatural fiction, but many authors who, in their day, were as popular as Dickens, are long forgotten.

"Most people don't realise that authors such as Rudyard Kipling and Edith Nesbit, who wrote The Railway Children, produced some wonderful supernatural tales.

"When we were researching for possible titles, we became aware of the remarkable story of the creation of Sweeney Todd.

"Up until then, to me, like most people, Sweeney Todd was a character whose origins seemed to lie somewhere between fact and fiction.

"But I learnt that he made his first appearance in 1847 in a serial published by Edward Lloyd."

So who, exactly, was Mr Lloyd?

Helen has a few facts about this dark prince of the printing presses. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Real Truth Behind Demon Barber of Fleet Street; Books ANONYMOUS Sweeney Todd or the String of Pearls (Wordsworth Editions, Pounds 2.99)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.