The Year Ahead on Capitol Hill: Higher Education Advocates Hope Congress Will Address Pell Grant Increases, Textbook Costs and Other Priorities before the Fall Presidential Campaign

By Dervarics, Charles | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, January 10, 2008 | Go to article overview

The Year Ahead on Capitol Hill: Higher Education Advocates Hope Congress Will Address Pell Grant Increases, Textbook Costs and Other Priorities before the Fall Presidential Campaign


Dervarics, Charles, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


With a presidential election on the horizon, 2008 on Capitol Hill is shaping up as a year for quick action on budget, student aid and other education bills before the fall campaign takes the national spotlight, advocates say.

"The battles are going to start in January," says Carmen Berkley, vice president of the United States Student Association. Topping the list is funding for the current and the next federal fiscal years. After using his veto pen to help rein in federal spending last fall, President Bush gets another chance in early February when he will present his 2009 education budget.

USSA is seeking long-range increases in the Pell Grant to $9,000 a year for needy students, about double its current amount, Berkley says. Increases in college work/study, GEAR UP and college-access programs also are on the group's agenda.

But the budget is not the only issue on the minds of education advocates, who cited these topics in their 2008 agendas: Textbook costs: Large increases and high costs make it difficult for many needy students to afford the ongoing costs of college. For community college students, textbooks can account for 40 percent of total attendance cost, says Luke Swarthout, higher education advocate at U.S. Public Interest Research Group (PIRG).

A bipartisan House bill on the Higher Education Act (HEA) has language requiring more disclosure from publishers about textbook prices. "Faculty are the point of sale for textbooks," he says, but publishers often hide the prices from them.

Other bill language would discourage the bundling of textbooks with CDROMs, study guides and other add-ons that drive up costs. "We need to help the market work more efficiently," Swarthout says.

HEA action: "HEA has not been reauthorized in 10 years," Berkley says. But some see hope, since the House and Senate have discussed bills with bipartisan support.

Progress has slowed in part because Congress was taking up renewal of the No Child Left Behind Act, Swarthout says. But there is positive momentum. "HEA is not a ghost ship," he says.

For U.S. PIRG, one priority in the HEA bill is stronger language on student loans to protect students and stop unnecessary borrowing, particularly through high-cost private loans when they still may be able to borrow through federally subsidized programs. "Students need to be aware of their federal options," Swarthout says.

At the Council for Opportunity in Education, one priority on HEA is to "close the books" on controversial Education Department plans regarding Upward Bound, says Susan Trebach, a COE spokeswoman. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Year Ahead on Capitol Hill: Higher Education Advocates Hope Congress Will Address Pell Grant Increases, Textbook Costs and Other Priorities before the Fall Presidential Campaign
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.