African-American Studies and Religion: Reaching out to the Post-Civil Rights Generation

Diverse Issues in Higher Education, January 10, 2008 | Go to article overview

African-American Studies and Religion: Reaching out to the Post-Civil Rights Generation


Eddie Glaude Jr.

Title: The William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American Studies, Princeton University

Education: Ph.D., Religion, Princeton University; M.A., Religion, Princeton University; M.A., African-American Studies, Temple University; B.A., Political Science, Morehouse College

Age:39

The decade of the 1990s saw the emergence of a number of Black scholars whose speeches and writings on race reached a broad audience of Americans and were hailed as public intellectuals. This decade, Black intellectuals, representing the most recent generation of scholars and public figures in their 30s and 40s, have begun to make themselves heard on a variety of topics, including post-civil rights politics, the impact of hip-hop culture and race relations.

Any serious list of these newly influential Black public intellectuals should include Dr. Eddie Glaude Jr., a professor of religion and African-American studies at Princeton University. Although Glaude may be best known as a collaborator with Dr. Cornel West and talk show host Tavis Smiley on the efforts that launched the Covenant With Black America, his writings and speeches on post-civil rights politics, including In A Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America, stand to definitively shape the thinking of Blacks and others born during and after the civil rights movement.

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Glaude's In A Shade of Blue, published in 2007, urges African-Americans to be mindful of the civil rights experience, but avoid "fixed ideas and categories of the past" that could limit the impact of Black political action. He contends that the ideas of pragmatism elaborated by American philosopher John Dewey are appropriate to the renewal of African-American politics.

A native of Moss Point, Miss., Glaude says his career owes much of its current prominence to mentorship by leading senior scholars, rigorous self-study and intellectual discipline, and good fortune. Raised in a working-class family, Glaude credits his parents with making education the highest priority for Glaude, his brother and two sisters.

"I've been blessed. I've been in the right places to connect with people who've helped and influenced me enormously," he notes.

There's currently an all-star cast of Black scholars based at Princeton that includes two of Glaude's former mentors. They are West and Dr. Albert Raboteau, a professor of religion and African-American studies, who now count themselves as friends and colleagues of the young scholar. …

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