Timber: Growth Industry; Rural Affairs Editor Andrew Forgrave Reports on a Major Modern Revival for an Ancient Building Material

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), January 24, 2008 | Go to article overview

Timber: Growth Industry; Rural Affairs Editor Andrew Forgrave Reports on a Major Modern Revival for an Ancient Building Material


Byline: Andrew Forgrave

CONCERN over climate change is likely to fuel a boom in Welsh forestry as a new wave of timber buildings is constructed.

Forestry Commission Wales is looking to showcase timber's potential to builders by constructing a model sustainable house using Welsh timber and packed with environmentally-friendly features.

The idea came from sustainability minister Jane Davidson who believes wood have an increasingly valuable role in future construction.

"There is no more sustainable a building material than wood," she told a timber conference in Cardiff last autumn.

"It locks away large amounts of carbon. It is a lightweight, attractive and flexible material with high insulation properties that will help to drive down the carbon footprint of our construction industry and can be grown, processed and used locally - so reducing 'timber miles'."

In the past advocates of timber homes have struggled to convince builders, architects and consumers that wood's inherent qualities - design flexibility, lightness and speed of build - outweigh those of traditional bricks and mortar.

But global warming has moved the goalposts and timber is now seen as a valuable brake of greenhouse gas emissions - especially now the Welsh Assembly Government wants to make all new buildings zero carbon by 2011.

"Timber can provide energy efficient buildings at affordable cost. It is a natural sustainable material which inherently boasts very good insulation properties," said Carey Lewis, of Wood Knowledge Wales, the newly formed research arm of the Welsh Forest Business Partnership.

"To build sustainably we have to build differently, and that means looking at a range of options - but both here and across Europe the most energy efficient buildings are constructed of wood."

Since 1997 carbon dioxide emissions from housing have risen more than 5% and now account for 27% of Wales' carbon footprint.

Timber homes often a solution - there is no question they are more thermally efficient, less carbon dioxide is produced in their construction and less material is used as well - particularly in foundations. And their lighter frames are expected to adapt better to ground shrinkages as the weather hots up.

Such benefits have already seen the UK timber house market grow 10% a year since 2004 - in Scotland more than half the new homes are built using timber frames.

If this trend is to be accelerated, logistical problems in Wales' forestry must first be overcome.

According to Derek Jones, of the Centre for the Built Environment, NEWI, Wrexham, supply chains must be modernised to ensure quantity and availability of wood.

He said: "In a typical Welsh valley there will be not a single managed tree and in many cases those that are felled are cut as low value logs."

At present roughly half of Welsh woodlands is managed for the Assembly Government by the Forestry Commission and half is in private ownership. Harvested volume is greater by proportion from the public sector: the trick will be to increase the contribution of the private sector.

The Welsh Forest Business Partnership, which emerged from work done by the GATE (Gaining Added value from Timber in Europe) project, has been given the job of co-ordinating supply and marketing issues for Wales' 1,700 wood-related companies.

Already its work is bearing fruit. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Timber: Growth Industry; Rural Affairs Editor Andrew Forgrave Reports on a Major Modern Revival for an Ancient Building Material
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.