Michele O'Marah and Henry Taylor: Sister at Rental

By Breidenbach, Tom | Artforum International, January 2008 | Go to article overview

Michele O'Marah and Henry Taylor: Sister at Rental


Breidenbach, Tom, Artforum International


In their recent exhibition, "Repeat after me: I AM a Revolutionary," Michele O'Marah and Henry Taylor considered the civil rights struggle from distinct yet complementary perspectives. The show was a chance to reflect on a political era more charged than our own with the hope of achieving social justice, and with the expectation that individual struggle might lead to meaningful participation in the fate of community and nation. Though in terms of cultural integration certain of the advances envisioned by the civil rights movement have come to pass, "Repeat after me ..." spoke to the racism that persists today, and to the economic and class issues that underlie it.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Huey Newton (all works 2007), Taylor's large portrait of the Black Panther Party leader, is modeled on the iconic photo of the man flanked by African tribal shields and seated in an elegant wicker chair, a rifle in one hand and a spear in the other. Reminding us of the continued relevance of a previous generation's commitment, the artist has collaged headlines about the recent death of Sean Bell, the unarmed black man killed by New York police on the evening of his bachelor party, on either side of Newton's sober stare.

Taylor's portrait of Eldridge Cleaver contrasts with that of Newton, alluding to the differences between the two Black Panther Party leaders themselves. Apportioned into geometric forms, this more brooding and elemental image presents Cleaver seated in iconic profile in the manner of "Whistler's Mother" (aka James McNeill Whistler's Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1: Portrait of the Painter's Mother, 1871). He is presented as the cerebral cool to Newton's confrontational heat. It's as if--unlike Newton--he needn't confront the viewer directly, or as though the individual, internal revolution were the ideal focus of contemplation.

The exhibition isn't a particularly nostalgic or romanticized take on the civil rights era, many of whose leaders were either killed or, like Cleaver and Newton, faced a range of personal trials. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Michele O'Marah and Henry Taylor: Sister at Rental
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.