I Am Pleased to Announce That We Are Transitioning the Human Resource Planning Executive Editor Role from Me to Ed Gubman (Strategic Talent Solutions)

By Vosburgh, Richard M. | Human Resource Planning, December 2007 | Go to article overview

I Am Pleased to Announce That We Are Transitioning the Human Resource Planning Executive Editor Role from Me to Ed Gubman (Strategic Talent Solutions)


Vosburgh, Richard M., Human Resource Planning


I am pleased to announce that we are transitioning the Human Resource Planning executive editor role from me to Ed Gubman (Strategic Talent Solutions). I have been in this role for five years-it has been a labor of love as well as one beck of a journey (including geographically from Houston to Singapore to Las Vegas). Under Ed's leadership, I have no doubt that the journal will continue to grow in making the unique connection between people and strategy. Ed has served the journal well over the past five years as an associate articles editor with responsibility for the knowledge area of HR Strategy & Planning. We have all been thrilled that he accepted our request to become the executive editor. I warned him that they told me this was a two-year assignment (and five years later ...). For the last year we have been discussing and executing succession within the editor roles--in this case, the cobbler's children have shoes. As we are the Human Resource Planning Society, it is nice to practice what we preach! Ed is the special edition editor for our final edition of 2007, a special journal on HR's role in supporting the CEO's growth agenda. We will have continuity on the team: For a year I will "switch" with Ed and take on the HR Strategy & Planning area--my poor, humble attempt to avoid withdrawal symptoms from a group that I learn from and have fun with every time we interact (I also suspect they may like meeting at Bellagio); and I will continue as secretary on the HRPS board of directors.

Richard Vosburgh

SVP-HR, MGM MIRAGE

rvosburgh@mgmmirage.com

Special Edition Editor Introduction

We started planning this special issue on HR's role in the CEO's growth agenda early in 2007 when the economy was in high speed and the race to grow your business was top of everyone's mind. Richard Vosburgh and Rich Lynch of Oyster International brought forward the idea for the issue. Oyster is a consulting firm that specializes in helping clients establish new growth platforms (NGPs). Our editorial group was intrigued by the idea of NPGs, though it took a while for all of us to understand the concept. When Rich said the best current example is the iPod, then we got it a little faster. (As I write this while sitting on an airplane, my iPod is blasting away in my ears--"Spoonful" by Cream, in case you're interested.)

As our team of editors considered the issue, we felt we should address the broad issue of business growth, including, but not limited to, NGPs. So, as you read on, you will see our authors consider what HR needs to do to support growth in existing and new business models, through mergers and acquisitions, through innovation, and in the other ways companies attack their top line goals.

Since the early part of the year, the US economy has sputtered some, largely because of the sub prime lending crisis and the resulting credit crunch. Still, despite slower economic growth on the horizon, the business growth imperative has not gone away. Sometime after the brief recession of 2001 to 2002, businesses realized that bottom-line cost cutting and restructuring were not enough to keep them competitive. Some companies, like Google and Starbucks, always have been focused on growth, but others, including icon GE, have had to reorient themselves to find new ways to push the top-line faster.

It must be working. We are in the fifth year of a bull market, and most analysts think there is more room to go. So far the market is up about 100 percent over five years, which is still way below the average of the last five bull runs. The underlying foundation for a bullish stock market is earnings growth, so companies have to continue to seek out fast paths to grow. As an editorial group, we felt that five years was enough experience among companies to help us report back to you the changes HR is making to support growth.

The fun of editing or co-editing a special issue of this journal-and this is my third after Engagement and Retention, with Fred Frank, and Innovation, with Jay Jamrog--is how much you learn by shaping an approach to a significant business topic. …

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