Ideas Exchange: Why Do You Feel Closure Is an Important Element of Each Physical Education Class? What Methods Do You Use to Bring Closure to Your Lessons?

By Smith, Shelley Paul | Strategies: A Journal for Physical and Sport Educators, January-February 2008 | Go to article overview

Ideas Exchange: Why Do You Feel Closure Is an Important Element of Each Physical Education Class? What Methods Do You Use to Bring Closure to Your Lessons?


Smith, Shelley Paul, Strategies: A Journal for Physical and Sport Educators


Children are primarily learning kinesthetically in the physical education classroom. Throughout the movement time, activities are interpreted while the intellect decodes the movements, assigns meaning, and integrates the information. Closure is an important element of each physical education lesson because that is when the significance of the lesson may be realized by the students. The message is received and the eyes twinkle with understanding. A few effective methods of closure include students demonstrating new skills, questioning, and asking for feedback.

Patricia Furlong

Pierremont Physical Education

Parkway School District

Closure, as I use it in the physical education classroom, "sums up" what we worked on during the day. It's a time for reflection and a check on my teaching--"Did I get the message across?"

Following are the various methods I use with my K, 2nd, and 3rd grade students:

1. What were the "important" words (elements) that we used today when performing ...?

2. Can you demonstrate how you would perform the actual skill without equipment (i.e., underhand or overhand throw, forehand or backhand in tennis, foot patterns in jump rope skills, etc.)? Usually done in the line to refocus students before sending them off to their classroom.

3. Before we put equipment away, I ask the children to demonstrate the skill we have been working on before they can return equipment.

4. Sometimes I have them do a brief written statement about what we worked on. Either I pose a question, or I have an actual reflection sheet prepared for the students.

5. We come together as a group and discuss what we felt went well in our game and what didn't--trying to focus on cooperation and team building.

6. Students share positive statements about what they saw classmates doing or heard classmates saying in game activities. Again, this works on team building and cooperation.

7. Ask the children their opinions about the activity or game. A vote--thumbs up, thumbs down or sideways--gives me a feeling as to how they liked it.

8. I also like to have the children explain to their classroom teacher what we worked on in class. Not only does it give them a chance to let me know if they got the key points, it also lets the classroom teacher know what we are learning in PE.

9. How could we use this information outside the PE classroom?

10. I will ask the students to quickly pair up and then I either pose a question to them, or ask them something that they need to share with me prior to lining up or leaving the gym.

Jane Keily

Lower School PE Department Chair

University School of Milwaukee, WI

Closure is important because it allows the teacher to reflect upon the overall objective for the lesson, and to see how effective they were at delivering it. One way I bring closure to my lessons each day is to restate the objective and get verbal responses from students. Another method of closure is to give a written assessment question at the conclusion of the lesson to evaluate if the content/objective was mastered. I believe having closure or reflection upon the lesson at the end of every class is important to find out if the students understood the lesson objective.

Michelle Iglehart

Spring Branch Elementary

Independence School District

Independence, MO

I feel closure is perhaps one of the most neglected areas of the lessons. It is vital in order to bridge the next lesson cycle.

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