Gender Equality : Meps Point to Educational Discrimination against Young Women

European Social Policy, February 14, 2007 | Go to article overview
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Gender Equality : Meps Point to Educational Discrimination against Young Women


"Education and training of girls and women is a human right and an essential element for the full enjoyment of all other social, economic, cultural and political rights," says the European Parliament in an own-initiative report drafted by Vera Flasarova (GUE/NGL, Czech Republic). The MEPs believe a range of measures are needed to tackle educational discrimination between men and women in Europe.

In the European Union, women make less progress overall than men through the education system, including lifelong learning, on account of diverse gender-related restrictions, say MEPs. The rapporteur lists a number of barriers: economic factors in socially disadvantaged families, gender-based prejudices in the choice of field of study, gender-based reasons hindering the completion of studies and preventing young women from improving their existing qualifications, prejudice against educated women, religious prejudice preventing women from fulfilling their potential in society in certain countries, difficulty of access to education for girls and young women from immigrant or minority backgrounds.

Among its recommendations, the European Parliament suggests that policy in the area of equal access to education should involve an assessment of gender-differentiated statistics. It also recommends that member states create and monitor national educational policies designed to enable all girls to complete compulsory schooling.

VULNERABLE GROUPS

Special policies are needed for national, ethnic and cultural minorities, especially the Roma minority, including pre-school and zero-grade' programmes, with a multicultural approach to combat double discrimination.

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Gender Equality : Meps Point to Educational Discrimination against Young Women
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