Social Policy/environment : Study Assesses Employment Impact of Climate Change

European Social Policy, July 18, 2007 | Go to article overview
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Social Policy/environment : Study Assesses Employment Impact of Climate Change


Climate policies must be clear, certain and foreseeable if they are to result in the private investments that will create many potential jobs, concludes a study on climate change and employment, published on 9 July. According to the study, while it is increasingly evident that there is a link between climate change and employment, the full measure of that relationship is still not being fully grasped. The anticipated job gains and losses are sizeable, however, and no sector of economic activity will be spared.

The first part of the report reviews the potential implications of climate change for employment, concluding that even moderate climate change will affect economic activity and employment in Europe, with certain regions and economic sectors particularly vulnerable. Part two looks at the stakes for employment and the transition to a lower-carbon economy by 2030 in four key sectors of the economy: energy production, transport, the steel and cement industries and building-construction.

Different scenarios for cutting CO2 emissions by around 40% by 2030 and their effects on employment and qualifications are reviewed, with the conclusion that while such measures are not expected to lead to a net loss of jobs, they will bring about substantial changes in employment demand and in qualifications within and between sectors.

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Social Policy/environment : Study Assesses Employment Impact of Climate Change
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