Operation of Gas Turbines in Heavy Fuel Oils

Economic Review, July 1995 | Go to article overview

Operation of Gas Turbines in Heavy Fuel Oils


The continuing development of the gas turbine has resulted in its increased use for power generation throughout the world, especially in high efficiency combined cycle stations. Today there are gas turbines available which are capable of burning a wide range of fuels, even the lowest and cheapest grades of commercial fuel oil, and this flexibility has often been a crucial factor in its selection. Alfa Laval have developed and proved a range of fuel treatment systems which keep pace with the gas turbine technology. In addition to proven separation systems for cleaning fuel oil, the Alfa Laval equipment range has been extended to include fuel conditioning systems.

They now offer power stations a fully integrated fuel treatment system, from the fuel oil settling tanks to the gas turbine. For equipment suppliers and owners, this means a single supplier that can assume total responsibility, including service and spare parts, for the entire fuel treatment system - cleaning and conditioning. Fuel Conditioning Systems for gas turbine fuel oils are the systems which control the supply of fuel from the day tanks to the gas turbines. The functions of the Fuel Conditioning System will depend on the type of fuel oil and the specific conditions required at the gas turbine. A high content of filterable dirt in these oils usually means that self-cleaning filters must be employed in the fuel train otherwise cartridge filters would require frequent filter changes. Normally gas turbines burning heavy fuel oils crudes will have a backup supply of distillate required during start-up and shutdown operations. An important function of the Fuel Conditioning System is to select the desired fuel and precisely control the changeover in response to signals from the gas turbine operator. For low viscosity crude oils, some gas turbine manufacturers have units which can start up and close down directly on this type of fuel.

In such cases a fuel selection function will be unnecessary. Vanadium can cause high temperature corrosion in a gas turbine. It is present in fuel oils in a complex oil soluble form and cannot be removed by mechanical separation. When vanadium levels in the fuel oil exceed gas turbine manufacturers recommendations, it will be necessary to inhibit the vanadium to prevent high temperature vanadic corrosion. However, the use of magnesium-based additives has provided a commercially acceptable and practical solution to the problem.

In the presence of magnesium, vanadium forms non-corrosive compounds with high melting points during combustion.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Operation of Gas Turbines in Heavy Fuel Oils
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.