Flip-Flopping Lloyd George Drew the Wrath of Post-War Toy-Makers; Manufacturer's Jibe in Form of Puppet PM

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), February 2, 2008 | Go to article overview

Flip-Flopping Lloyd George Drew the Wrath of Post-War Toy-Makers; Manufacturer's Jibe in Form of Puppet PM


Byline: Emily Lambert

Loved or despised, David Lloyd George (1863-1945) is undoubtedly the most famous Welsh politician.

On February 13, a rare British-made portrait of a Prime Minister who guided the country through the First World War will be sold.

Consigned by a Cardiff family, the toy, made of wood and a form of papier mache, turns somersaults, perhaps a wry comment on the Welsh Wizard's frequent changes of mind.

At the outbreak of the war, Lloyd George was Chancellor of the Exchequer, a post that he retained for the first 10 months.

After a period in control of munitions, he became Prime Minister in 1916 and it was his policies, including conscription, that led to the Armistice of 1918.

The British toy-makers were resentful towards the Lloyd George administration, as it had given the manufacturers to understand that if they re-tooled and went into serious production of toys during the 1914-18 war, they would be given protection from German imports afterwards.

Consequently, in the years before 1920, many went into receivership, as the promised import duties were removed and again Britain became dependent on imports, particularly German but also Japanese. …

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