Digital and Ebook Collections

Searcher, January 2008 | Go to article overview

Digital and Ebook Collections


Alexa Internet

http://www.alexa.com

Provides catalogs of public domain web sites.

Bartleby.Com

http://www.bartleby.com

This site publishes the classics of literature, nonfiction, and reference free of charge. Its collection of reference books including the American Heritage Dictionary, Roget's Thesaurus, the Columbia Encyclopedia, and the Encyclopedia of American History as well as the King James Bible, books on English language usage, books of quotations, and histories of English and American literature, including The Harvard Classics the Shelf of Fiction, are linked to the actual texts. All of the texts may be searched by keyword from the Bartleby.com front page.

Berkeley Digital Library SunSITE

http://sunsite.berkeley.edu

The Berkeley Digital Library SunSITE builds digital collections and services and provides information and support to digital library developers worldwide. Its wide array of collections includes incunabula at the Bancroft Library.

Books-on-line.com

http://www.books-on-line.com

Primarily links to titles at other sites, but does carry more than 49,000 mostly-free books online.

Bookstacks

http://www.bookstacks.org

Bookstacks is a small volunteer effort, providing quality, hand-coded ebooks for free. There are 86 books to choose from right now, from 29 different authors. The latest addition is the PDF version of a Leo Tolstoy work (in Russian).

byGosh.com

http://www.bygosh.com

This free, online, illustrated collection of children's stories includes novels, nonfiction, stories, poems, and kid's classics, all--as far as the site knows--out of copyright in the U.S.

Classic Book Library

http://classicbook.info

A collection of online ebooks featuring mystery, science fiction, children's books and romance.

Classical Authors Directory

http://authorsdirectory.com

Portraits, biographies, and pictures of 460 classic authors, as well as 1,258 online books of classical literature enhanced with annotations from the Encyclopedia of the Self.

ClassicAuthors.net

http://classicauthors.net

Includes archives of now public domain works by various well-known American and British authors.

The Classics in ASCII

http://www.textfiles.com/etext

Public domain fiction and nonfiction etexts at Textfiles.com.

Corpus of Middle English Prose and Verse

Bibliography

http://quodlib.umich.edu/c/cme

An extensive archive of Middle-English electronic texts (none of which are translated into modern English, however), including works by Chaucer and the ubiquitous Anonymous.

The Digital Book Index

http://www.digitalbookindex.com

A database of more than 90,000 fiction and nonfiction ebooks from more than 1,800 publishers. Many categories of books are listed, including reference, history, children's, and African American studies. Titles are from commercial and noncommercial publishers and vendors and may be free or available by subscription or purchase. The site also links to ebook reader software. Registration required.

Duke Papyrus Archive

http://scriptorium.lib.duke.edu/papyrus

Features online access to more than 1,375 ancient Egyptian papyri.

Electronic Books

http://www.stockton.lib.ca.us/ebooks.htm

Created by Karen Ramos, a librarian at the Stockton-San Joaquin County (Calif.) Public Library, this directory offers annotated links for electronic book information in the categories Free E-book Sites, Free Personal Digital Assistant [PDA] Sites, Commercial Sites, Ebook Reader Software, and Dedicated E-book Readers. There are also tips for reading ebooks online, searching for text in e-books, and saving ebooks.

The English Server (EServer)

http://eserver. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Digital and Ebook Collections
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.