Weekly PEJ Survey: Bill Clinton Got More Coverage Last Week Than Any Republican in the Race

Editor & Publisher, January 29, 2008 | Go to article overview

Weekly PEJ Survey: Bill Clinton Got More Coverage Last Week Than Any Republican in the Race


Bill Clinton, the man known as The Big Dog, growled his way to a large share of media coverage last week on the campaign trail, behind only his wife and Barack Obama and ahead of any Republican.

Here's the summary from Tom Rosenstiel, dirrector of the Project for Excellence in Journalism, which does a weekly study of news coverage.*

Former President Bill Clinton received more press attention in last week's election coverage than any Republican candidate for the White House and Democrat John Edwards. Barack Obama, with his big South Carolina primary win, was the media exposure winner, registering as a significant or dominant newsmaker in 41% of the campaign stories. Hillary Clinton was right behind at 40%. And her husband was next at 18%, according to an analysis of campaign coverage by the Project for Excellence in Journalism from January 21 through 27. Fully 56% of the stories focused on Democrats; nearly twice as many as on Republicans (30%). Part of this decline could be attributed to the drop in coverage for Republicans Mike Huckabee (6%) and Mitt Romney (12%). …

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