Demographics Split Hillary, Obama Vote; Super Tuesday Reveals Trends

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 7, 2008 | Go to article overview

Demographics Split Hillary, Obama Vote; Super Tuesday Reveals Trends


Byline: Brian DeBose, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Exit polls from Super Tuesday contests show that the Democratic Party's two remaining presidential candidates split votes among class, age, sex and race.

"Barack Obama continued to do well among voters who are younger, better-educated and wealthier; he solidified his support among African-Americans; and he ran strongly among men, including white men," said William A. Galston, a senior fellow for governance studies at the Brookings Institution.

Using Tuesday's results as a gauge for upcoming matchups, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York is expected to do well among working-class voters, less-educated Americans, those 45 and older, white women, Hispanics and Asian-Americans. Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois can count on male and female blacks, voters younger than 40 and white men.

Mrs. Clinton's strength among white women solidified her victories.

She took 73 percent of white female votes in Alabama, 57 percent in Georgia, 56 percent in California, 59 percent in Missouri and 73 percent in Tennessee.

She dominated the Hispanic vote in almost every state where it was measurable - including 62 percent of Hispanic men and 71 percent of Hispanic women in California, 49 percent and 59 percent in Arizona, and 56 percent and 65 percent in New Mexico.

Mrs. Clinton prevailed with Asian-American voters in California as well, with 71 percent supporting her. That bodes well for her in states with considerable Asian-American populations, such as Washington and Oregon. In Hawaii, where Mr. Obama was born and his family still lives, voters could negate her advantage.

Mrs. Clinton had a decisive advantage with poor, less-educated voters, while Mr. Obama had the edge with educated and wealthy voters.

Mr. Obama received considerable support from white men, even in states he lost. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Demographics Split Hillary, Obama Vote; Super Tuesday Reveals Trends
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.