Whither Archaeology? Peter Furtado Welcomes an Opportunity to Discuss Archaeology with the Experts

By Furtado, Peter | History Today, February 2008 | Go to article overview

Whither Archaeology? Peter Furtado Welcomes an Opportunity to Discuss Archaeology with the Experts


Furtado, Peter, History Today


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

As the article opposite reminds us, there seems to be no end to the insights of the past that archaeologists are offering us, especially within Britain itself. Just in recent months we have had reports of a unique hoard of Roman buckets and dishes that turned up at the bottom of an old well in London, and a remarkable find of Iron Age cauldrons in Wiltshire, unearthed by a metal detectorist in a field.

Public interest in the subject is sky-high, exemplified and stimulated by the high-profile television coverage, which manages to stress the excitement of discovery, while still (usually) giving due weight to the more technical matters of analysis and interpretation. And the huge success of the Portable Antiquities Scheme has brought the once-anarchic band of detectorists into the academic fold, giving a direct point of contact and offering them every encouragement to come forward with their finds.

As a result, dialogue between professionals and the public is rich, complex and two-way--arguably even more so than dialogue between historians and the public. And to further that dialogue, Lisa Westcott, editor of the enterprising magazine Current Archaeology, has initiated an ambitious two-day conference run in collaboration with the Portable Antiquities Scheme, to be held at the British Museum on February 9th-10th, showcasing the best of British archaeology, and introducing selected world archaeological projects.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Whither Archaeology? Peter Furtado Welcomes an Opportunity to Discuss Archaeology with the Experts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.