Naval International Aviation Logistics Process Improvement through Enhanced International Partner Relationships

By Weinberger, Ron | DISAM Journal, December 2007 | Go to article overview

Naval International Aviation Logistics Process Improvement through Enhanced International Partner Relationships


Weinberger, Ron, DISAM Journal


The Naval International Aviation Logistics Process Improvement Team (LPIT), consists of representative members from:

* Navy International Program Office (Navy IPO)

* Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR)

* Naval Inventory Control Point (NAVICP)

* Defense Logistics Agency (DLA)

* Industry

* Foreign military sales (FMS) partners

In addition the list above, guests from other agencies and organizations, changed the course of NAVAIR international logistics support by enhancing relationships with international partners to form a "One Team" philosophy. At the LPIT annual Naval International Logistics Workshops, international partners have been empowered to select and provide feedback on their top issues, which are worked by the LPIT community throughout the year. Some of these issues include:

* Third party transfer

* Diminishing manufacturing sources and material shortages (DMSMS) and parts obsolescence

* Transportation

* Out-of inventory (OOI) weapon systems support

* Performance based logistics (PBLs)

Innovative ideas and recommendations have resolved major international logistics issues and resulted in multiple benefits for the international community. Through LPIT efforts, international logistics benchmarks have been set and models established that will continue to be used in the future. While developing and implementing new international logistics methods, the LPIT has also enhanced NAVAIR's international logistics profession for Product Support Team Leaders and the FMS Deputy Assistant Program Managers for Logistics by clearly defining and articulating their mission, responsibilities, and goals.

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Through revised emphasis on international partner relationships, there has been a noticeable increase in international partner participation at Naval International Aviation Workshops. There were sixty-five international participants representing nineteen nations at the LPIT Workshop on 30 April through 3 May 2007. This represented over a 100 percent increase in international attendees from the previous year.

Working as one team can make everyone stronger and more successful. This has been the case with the LPIT and the emphasis on listening to the voice of international partners throughout the year and in a formal, facilitated session at the annual LPIT Workshop. Some of the top issues worked by the LPIT are discussed below.

Diminishing Manufacturing Sources and Material Shortages and Parts Obsolescence--Number One Issue in 2006

In 2006, NAVAIR LPIT members were asked to join the Department of Defense (DoD) Diminishing Manufacturing Sources and Material Shortages (DMSMS) Working Group, which supports Office of the Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Materiel Readiness Policy (ADUSD (MR&MP)) and Assistant Under Secretary of Defense for Logistics Plans and Programs (ADUSD (LP&P)). LPIT members had an immediate impact on that DoD committee. The chairman of the DoD DMSMS Working Group asked NAVAIR to take a primary role for all the DoD international programs by leading the new DMSMS Foreign Military Sales (FMS) Interoperability Committee, which has a goal to assist U.S. coalition forces with affordable readiness. As a result of the LPIT's work on this committee, DMSMS FMS initiatives were presented this year at the Joint Council on Aging Aircraft's annual conference.

The LPIT has made several contributions to integrate international partners into the DMSMS process. LPIT members understand that the international community's DMSMS mitigation consists mainly of life of type buys, that the process is very reactionary, that funding deadlines are very short fused, and that there is a lack of communication by original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and vendors regarding alternative sources. The LPIT has attacked these problems as well as worked to provide international partners access to available DMSMS tools and data based on platform configuration and defining quick parts qualification processes with the OEMs.

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