Reform of Welfare, Immigration Potentially Harmful to Asian Americans

By Coleman, Chinhayi | Nation's Cities Weekly, September 18, 1995 | Go to article overview

Reform of Welfare, Immigration Potentially Harmful to Asian Americans


Coleman, Chinhayi, Nation's Cities Weekly


Two House bills - immigration reform and welfare reform - could negatively impact Asian Pacific American families.

The immigration reform bill (HR 2202) currently being considered in the House of Representatives, would substantially reduce the categories in which U.S. citizens may petition for the immigration of relatives other than spouses and minor children.

The proposal would abolish categories for adult children and siblings, allowing only parents, minor children, and spouses of U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents.

Immigration for parents of citizens would be allowed only if 50 percent or more of their children are in the U.S. permanently and if full health insurance is pre-purchased. Parent visas would be eliminated if family visas exceed a cap of 330,000 persons.

Karen Narasaki, of the National Asian Pacific American Legal Consortium (NAPALC), raised questions in testimony before the House subcommittee considering immigration reform. She pointed out that "annual taxes paid by immigrants to all levels of government more than offset the costs of services received, generating a net annual surplus of $25 billion to $30 billion."

NAPALC opposes the elimination of the adult children category and the elimination of the sibling category for family immigrants, charging that the provisions do not recognize the dose relationship of Asian Pacific families and the importance of siblings in that relationship.

There is some concern that immigration restrictions may lead to discrimination against Asian Pacific Americans. Such discrimination was documented by a 1992 report of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Civil Rights Issues Facing Asian Americans in the 1990s.

The report describes discrimination that followed enactment of the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986. The law imposed sanctions on employers who hired undocumented workers. The sanctions led to discrimination against foreign-looking and foreign-sounding individuals seeking employment.

The report drew on a U.S. General Accounting Office report on the effects of the 1986 law, stating that GAO found "a widespread pattern of discrimination has resulted against eligible workers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Reform of Welfare, Immigration Potentially Harmful to Asian Americans
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.