Divide and Rule: ... How Africans and African-Americans Are Prevented from Working Together

New African, February 2008 | Go to article overview

Divide and Rule: ... How Africans and African-Americans Are Prevented from Working Together


"Special clandestine operations should be launched by the CIA to generate mistrust and hostility in American and world opinion against joint activity of [Africans and African-Americans], and to cause division among Black African radical national groups and their leaders." This was one of the scandalous recommendations contained in a report, NSCM/46, commissioned in March 1978 by President Jimmy Carter's administration. The report was put together by the National Security Council Interdepartmental Group for Africa (which has just been uncovered by New African), and seems to explain why Africans and African-Americans have had long-standing difficulties working together. It appears to have been a deliberate US government policy to undermine cooperation between Africa and its diaspora in America. We publish below the full report, which started with a letter, written by Zbigniew Brezinski, the then US national security adviser, on 17 March 1978 addressed to the secretaries of state and defence, the director of the Central Intelligence Agency, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and copied to the secretaries of the treasury and commerce, and the attorney general.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Subject: Black Africa and the US Black Movement

The President has directed that a comprehensive review be made of current developments in Black Africa from the point of view of their possible impacts on the black movement in the United States. The review should consider:

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

1. Long-term tendencies of social and political developments and the degree to which they are consistent with or contradict US interests.

2. Proposals for durable contacts between radical African leaders and leftist leaders of the US black community.

3. Appropriate steps to be taken inside and outside the country in order to inhibit any pressure by radical African leaders and organisations on the US black community for the latter to exert influence on the policy of the Administration toward Africa.

The President has directed that the NSC Interdepartmental Group for Africa perform this review. The review should be forwarded to the NSC Political Analysis Committee by 20 April [1978].

(Signed) Zbigniew Brezinski.

The Report

(On 20 April 1978, the National Security Council Interdepartmental Group for Africa duly presented its report to the NSC Political Analysis Committee, for onward transmission to the president. Below is the full text of the report).

National Security Council Interdepartmental Group for Africa. Study response to Presidential Security Review Memorandum NSWC-46. Black Africa and the US Black Movement.

I. Objective of our policy toward Black Africa is to prevent social upheavals which could radically change the political situation throughout the area. The success or failure of our policy in the region depends on the solution of international and internal issues whose importance to the United States is on the increase.

US interests in Black Africa

A multiplicity of interests influences the US attitude toward black Africa. The most important of these interests can be summarised as follows:

1. Political

If black African states assume attitudes hostile to the US national interest, our policy toward the white regimes; which is a key element in our relations with the black states, may be subjected by the latter to great pressure for fundamental change.

Thus, the West may face a real danger of being deprived of access to the enormous raw material resources of southern Africa which are vital for our defence needs as well as losing control over the Cape sea routes by which approximately 65% of Middle Eastern oil is supplied to Western Europe.

Moreover, such a development may bring about internal political difficulties by intensifying the activity of the black movement in the United States itself.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Divide and Rule: ... How Africans and African-Americans Are Prevented from Working Together
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.