Climate Change and Global Conflicts: "Cold" Wars Have Existed throughout History; Heat Wars Are Next

By Wagner, Cynthia G. | The Futurist, March-April 2008 | Go to article overview

Climate Change and Global Conflicts: "Cold" Wars Have Existed throughout History; Heat Wars Are Next


Wagner, Cynthia G., The Futurist


Traumatic climate cooling may have launched wars in the past, like the Little Ice Age of the mid-sixteenth through mid-nineteenth centuries. Cold-induced stresses on agriculture led to wars, famines, and population declines, an international team of researchers believes. Now, they warn that future climate change that turns up the heat could also increase conflicts.

Sudden changes in temperature don't directly cause conflict, but they do disrupt water and food supplies. Shortages of such critical resources can lead people to rise against their governments or invade neighboring countries, according to studies led by University of Hong Kong geographer David Zhang and published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

To study the relationship between climate and conflict, the researchers collected data on temperature change and wars from A.D. 1400 to 1900. They discovered that cycles of turbulence followed historic low temperatures, with tranquility restored during more-temperate times. Sources for the study included a database of 4,500 wars, assembled by co-author Peter Brecke of Georgia Tech, and climate records reconstructed by paleontologists from historical documents.

The researchers found that there were nearly twice as many wars per year worldwide during cold centuries as there were during the milder eighteenth century. More than 80% of countries around the world experienced more wars in a cold climate, according to Zhang.

The researchers reason that the link between climate shock and conflict is the supply of food: Decreases in agricultural production trigger increases in food prices, and when grain prices reach a certain level, wars erupt.

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Population growth and decline are also affected by these climate change driven conflicts, the researchers believe. After peak periods of war in Europe and Asia, such as during the frigid seventeenth century, populations declined. In China, population dropped by 43% between 1620 and 1650, then rose dramatically between 1650 and 1800, when the next cooling period began, bringing another global demographic shock.

"Climate change may have played a more important role on human civilization than has so far been suggested," says Zhang. The depletion of resources on which livelihoods are based is the most critical effect of such change and is "the root cause of human miseries--e. …

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Climate Change and Global Conflicts: "Cold" Wars Have Existed throughout History; Heat Wars Are Next
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