Mayors' Education Advisors Focus on High School Reform, Support for Learning

By Moore, Andrew O. | Nation's Cities Weekly, February 18, 2008 | Go to article overview

Mayors' Education Advisors Focus on High School Reform, Support for Learning


Moore, Andrew O., Nation's Cities Weekly


High school reform, out-of-school time programs and efforts to expand college access are just some of the strategies that mayors and their senior education advisors are implementing to improve local schools and increase graduation rates in their cities. These and other topics were the focus of a recent semi-annual meeting in San Diego of the Mayor's Education Policy Advisors Network (EPAN).

Sponsored by NLC's Institute for Youth, Education, and Families (YEF Institute) and supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, EPAN is a national network of mayoral education aides from the nation's 75 largest cities working on school improvement.

During the meeting, 20 EPAN members had the opportunity to visit a dynamic, new-design San Diego high school, dive into policy topics such as connecting in-school and out-of-school time and supporting the high school-to-college transition, and launch their own discussions on high school dropouts, college completion and the achievement gap among groups of students.

Embracing High School Alternatives

EPAN members have embraced municipal leadership for alternative high schools as an essential part of any city strategy to increase graduation rates.

During the meeting, speakers from The Big Picture Company and the National Association of Street Schools (NASS) infused ideas about how cities can work with alternative high school program providers to build public will for expanded high school options. NLC and The Big Picture Company are co-conveners of the Alternative High School Initiative (AHSI)--a network of youth development organizations committed to creating educational opportunities for youth who have struggled in traditional high school settings; NASS is one of 12 members of AHSI.

A visit to High Tech High, a school model now being replicated nationwide, showcased one unique option for high school in San Diego. With student and staff guides, visitors witnessed how the school's design principles of personalization, adult world connection and common intellectual mission show up in the small school population, project-based learning and a school culture conducive to learning. Larry Rosenstock, founder of High Tech High, reminded the group that when it comes to expanding options in the current global economy, "it's not about competition, it's about cooperation."

The meeting also provided EPAN members with an opportunity to learn from University of California-Los Angeles Professor Jeannie Oakes and Stanford University Professor Milbrey McLaughlin. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mayors' Education Advisors Focus on High School Reform, Support for Learning
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.