Pick a Side: Detroit Newspapers' Chief Challenges Chamber of Commerce and United Way to Choose a Side in the Ongoing Newspaper Strike

By Fitzgerald, Mark | Editor & Publisher, November 4, 1995 | Go to article overview

Pick a Side: Detroit Newspapers' Chief Challenges Chamber of Commerce and United Way to Choose a Side in the Ongoing Newspaper Strike


Fitzgerald, Mark, Editor & Publisher


DETROIT NEWSPAPERS' CHIEF Frank Vega is challenging the Detroit Chamber of Commerce and United Way charity with a question borrowed from the old union song: Which side are you on?

Vega is irritated that these pillars of the business establishment are staying neutral during the strike against the Detroit Free Press and Detroit News.

So now Detroit Newspapers, which runs business and production operations of the separately-owned papers, is considering dropping its longtime membership in the Greater Detroit Chamber of Commerce, and with-drawing from participation in the United Way of Southeast Michigan.

The chamber upset Vega when it re, fused to support resolutions he offered that would put the business group on record supporting management in the strike and condemning the sporadic violence wreaked by some union members.

In addition, the chamber has refused to let the News regularly use a tunnel that connects the chamber officers with the newspaper as a way to shuttle employees past picket lines. The chamber building once belonged to the News -- which donated it to group in 1984.

"By taking a neutral stance, the chamber isn't being neutral. It is supposed to support its members," Vega said in a Detroit News story written by reporter Charles E. Ramirez. "I can only assume because many of its members have union shops, it is acting timidly, trying not to rock the boat.

"We have to reconsider our support of the Chamber of Commerce. Why should we support an organization that has a philosophy of supporting economic development and business and does just the opposite?" he said.

In a recent interview, Detroit Newspapers spokeswoman Susie Ellwood said joint agency officials are still discussing internally whether to drop membership.

According to the News, Detroit Newspapers pays about $20,000 annually in dues to the chamber, which with 10,000 member businesses is the second-largest chamber in the United States.

Chamber president Dick Blouse says his organization has never involved itself in the labor affairs of its member businesses.

"We just are not in the business of getting involved in the business of businesses", Blouse said in a telephone interview.

"We certainly don't condone the violence. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pick a Side: Detroit Newspapers' Chief Challenges Chamber of Commerce and United Way to Choose a Side in the Ongoing Newspaper Strike
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.