Midwifery Education in Jordan: History, Challenges and Proposed Solutions

By Abushaikha, Lubna | Journal of International Women's Studies, November 2006 | Go to article overview

Midwifery Education in Jordan: History, Challenges and Proposed Solutions


Abushaikha, Lubna, Journal of International Women's Studies


Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical overview of midwifery education in Jordan during the past fifty years with an emphasis on the first bachelor of midwifery program in Jordan. Nine challenges of midwifery education that include expanding midwifery educational needs, accreditation of programs, recruiting qualified faculty members, clinical training, midwifery preceptorship, exit examinations, continuing midwifery education, recognition of midwifery graduates, and lack of graduate midwifery programs are presented. Proposed solutions for these challenges are discussed.

Keywords: education, Jordan, midwifery

Introduction

Jordan, as a developing country in southwest Asia, has a population of 5.5 million, a birth rate of 21.7/1000, a fertility rate of 2.7, a population growth of 2.6%, a maternal mortality rate of 41/1000, and an infant mortality rate of 17.4/1000 (Department of Statistics, 2005). These indicators are relatively high compared to most developed/industrial countries such as the United States were the population is 298.4 million, the birth rate is 14.1 /1000, the fertility rate is 2.1, the population growth rate is 0.9%, the maternal mortality rate is 8.3/1000, and the infant mortality rate is 6.4/1000 (World Factbook, 2006). Throughout the past twenty years, the Jordanian health indicators have dramatically improved despite enormous challenges to the health care system.

The Jordanian health care system consists of public health care services led by the Ministry of Health, military health care services, and private health care services. The Jordanian Ministry of Health employs 3250 physicians, 2543 registered nurses and 963 midwives who attend to over 71000 annual deliveries that occur in public health care clinical settings (Department of Statistics, 2005). These health care professionals provide the majority of health care services to the Jordanian public. Unfortunately, shortages in qualified nursing and midwifery personnel remain key obstacles that face the Jordanian health care system.

Another important challenge to health care in Jordan is the increasing numbers of women of childbearing age coinciding with the constant shortage of qualified midwifery staff that can attend to the health care needs of this particular population group. The issue of midwifery shortage and other midwifery issues such as professionalization and regulation are not particular to Jordan; they are international problems (McKendry & Langford, 2001; Fullerton, Severino, Brogan & Thompson, 2003; Neglia, 2003). Many countries such as The United States, Canada and The United Kingdom have had to deal with the issues of midwifery professionalization, regulation, and shortage in their own way, with some countries experiencing more success than others. In many countries in the world such as the UK, Canada, and Peru, and as a result of strong academic midwifery programs, more professional midwives have joined the health care workforce in their respective countries each year. Furthermore, midwives in these countries have gained full professional status and function as independent health care providers as a result of better education and professionalization (Barton, 1998; McKendry & Langford, 2002; Neglia, 2002). Hence, an effective strategy among several countries in the world to overcome staff shortages and other professional issues in health care professions has been improving basic and advanced education for all health care professionals (WHO 2001; Munich Declaration, 2002; McKendry & Langford, 2002; WHO, 2002).

In Jordan, shortcomings related to adequate legislation, organizations, and professionalization of most of the health care professions, specifically for nursing and midwifery, still exist. The issues of legislation, organization and professionalization of health care professions remain pertinent today as they were more than 30 years ago in Jordan, despite the fact that there are two professional bodies that are currently working to deal with these important issues. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Midwifery Education in Jordan: History, Challenges and Proposed Solutions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.