Getting to Know Dr. David Ikard

By Stewart, Pearl | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, February 21, 2008 | Go to article overview

Getting to Know Dr. David Ikard


Stewart, Pearl, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Dr. David Ikard's recent book, Breaking the Silence Toward a Black Male Feminist Criticism (LSU Press), has not only generated buzz within academia but has made its way onto the pop culture scene because of its insightful analysis of the writings of such literary giants as Toni Morrison, Walter Mosley and Toni Cade Bambara.

But it has been Ikard's trenchant and often irreverent commentary on hip-hop culture in recent months that has catapulted him into a spotlight shared by such notable scholars as Mark Anthony Neal of Duke University and Joan Morgan of Vanderbilt.

Ikard left the University of Tennessee-Knoxville last year for a position as an assistant professor of English at Florida State University, where he currently has a Ford Foundation postdoctoral research grant.

His new work-in-progress is To Be Real: Representing Black Humanity from Zora Neale Hurston to Dave Chappelle, which he summarizes: "Borrowing from the idea within Black feminist theory that all oppressions are interlocking, my project will examine literary texts ... to demonstrate how de-centering race as a marker of identity can empower traditionally oppressed and victimized groups."

During the past year, Ikard has been an occasional panelist, with Neal and Morgan, in a series of high-profile discussions titled "Does Hip-Hop Hate Women?" The session last April at the University of Chicago was featured on National Public Radio and televised on C-SPAN.

In his final semester at UT last spring, Ikard co-created a course titled "Hip-Hop Culture and Cultural Theory." The popularity--and notoriety--generated by the class led the student newspaper, The Daily Beacon, to interview Nard. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Getting to Know Dr. David Ikard
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.