Don't Call the Barmaid Love ... by Order! Pub Chat: Bet Lynch and Mike Baldwin in Coronation Street

Daily Mail (London), March 31, 2008 | Go to article overview

Don't Call the Barmaid Love ... by Order! Pub Chat: Bet Lynch and Mike Baldwin in Coronation Street


Byline: Steve Doughty

BAR managers and store owners face large-scale compensation claims iftheir customers ogle their barmaids, waitresses or check-out staff.

New sex discrimination laws also mean that landlords who allow loud sexistjokes or banter among drinkers could be taken before a tribunal.

The regulations say that bosses are responsible for protecting their staff fromsexual harassment by customers - and that those who fail to do so can faceunlimited compensation claims.

They mean that a pub landlord could be sued if a bar worker complains aboutbeing called 'love', or over customers telling each other off-colour jokes.

Restaurant managers or hoteliers risk action if staff object to backchat fromdiners or guests asking for a date.

Lawyers said yesterday that businesses will need to show they have tried toclamp down on sexual harassment of workers by customers if they are to guardagainst the risk of compensation claims.

They advised pub operators to put up warning notices telling drinkers that'harassment is not tolerated'.

The regulations were pushed through by Women and Equalities Minister HarrietHarman, who has powers under European legislation to amend discrimination law.

Miss Harman has used a statutory instrument that does not require a division ordebate in Parliament. Complying with the rules is likely to cost 'micro andsmall' businesses more than [pounds sterling]10million, according to an assessment by theGovernment Equalities Office.

Last year the High Court ruled that existing sex discrimination law was notstrong enough to meet the demands of European directives.

However the regulations - which will come into force on Sunday - have sweepingimplications for employers, especially in the pub, restaurant and hotel trade.

Stuart Chamberlain, an employment law specialist at Consult GEE, said:'Employers may feel uncomfortable about confronting clients but they need to beaware that failing to take action could result in a claim for compensation,including for injury to feelings.

'Shops, bars or gyms may be able to put up notices explaining that harassmentof staff is not tolerated by the management. However, professional servicescompanies who encourage staff to socialise with clients may find it far moredifficult to convey that message.' The rules allow tribunals to award unlimiteddamages for injury to feelings if a case is proved. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Don't Call the Barmaid Love ... by Order! Pub Chat: Bet Lynch and Mike Baldwin in Coronation Street
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.