Opening Up World's Top Library; Innovative, Interactive, Flashy Displays at Library of Congress

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 10, 2008 | Go to article overview

Opening Up World's Top Library; Innovative, Interactive, Flashy Displays at Library of Congress


Byline: Ann Geracimos, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

If experience really is the best teacher, the Library of Congress is determined to teach the public just how valuable - and, yes, modern - the venerable institution can be.

A series of largely interactive exhibits labeled the Library of Congress Experience, opening Saturday, will showcase the library's history and holdings in innovative ways that are even a bit flashy. Some dignified flash probably is good for a place that too often is regarded by the uninformed as off limits except to scholars and, of course, members of Congress.

In addition to the ambitious new project that Matt Raymond, director of communications, calls "easily the biggest project we've ever done," there is a new institutional logo - an open book resembling the American flag in abstract - and a new motto: "Explore, Discover, Be Inspired."

Those three activities describe precisely what organizers hope visitors will do when the bronze doors leading to the Great Hall of the Thomas Jefferson Building open to the public Saturday for the first time since 1990.

That's not to say the show inside isn't educational; there is plenty to please scholars traditionally drawn to the resources of the world's largest library, as well as more casual visitors. (A companion Web site is www.loc.gov/experience.) The difference now is that information is available on touch screens and through other eye- and ear-catching technology, including a dramatic free-standing wall that responds to a viewer's physical presence.

The wall introduces a section called "Creating the United States," and is made possible by hidden cameras focused on visitors' feet, a device that may be the first of its kind in a museum.

The section is one of four main features and exhibitions that can be experienced firsthand, using what officials call a Passport to Knowledge. Later this year, the passport will include individual bar codes to allow visitors to bookmark areas of interest in the exhibits that they can then access online at home on an interactive Web site - myLOC.gov - which will be launched Saturday.

In "Creating the United States," the largest of the four sections, it's possible to see in detail various drafts of the country's most famous documents as constructed by the Founding Fathers, including changes and corrections. An exhibit called "Thomas Jefferson's Library" re-creates his original library, containing 6,487 volumes that were given by him to found the library we know today. These include more than 2,000 surviving books from his own collection, in addition to replacements of the original titles.

"Art and Architecture of the Thomas Jefferson Building" emphasizes the history and ornate beauty of the Great Hall. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Opening Up World's Top Library; Innovative, Interactive, Flashy Displays at Library of Congress
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.