Between Art Research & Technology: Antonella Cimatti

By Giovannini, Rolando | Ceramics Art & Perception, December 2007 | Go to article overview

Between Art Research & Technology: Antonella Cimatti


Giovannini, Rolando, Ceramics Art & Perception


[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED]

THE CITY OF FAENZA IS NOTED IN THE WORLD FOR being one of the motherlands of ceramics. In particular, it embraces more than a millennium of terracotta, first engobed, and then glazed with a typical surface treatment containing tin.

But the city, above all at the beginning of the 1900s, was characterised for combining aspects of creativity with those of technological research of materials and processes. In reality, thanks to the enlightened mind of Gaetano Ballardini, who not only founded a museum (1908) that quickly became international, also implemented a School of Art and Craft (1916) where the pupils--few at the beginning--learnt and experimented with different techniques.

It could be said that the particularity of the Faentino 'style' not only resides in the extremely high quality of its rich polychromatic decoration well evident in its superlative maiolica production, but also, above all, in its attention to detail regarding production, its perfection of processes and the careful attention that is paid to the ways in which things are done.

Antonella Cimatti, having been trained at Faenza's Istituto Statale d'Arte per la Ceramica (State Art Institute for Ceramics), and having been both a pupil of Carlo Zauli and of l'Accademia di Belle Arti (Academy of Arts) in Bologna, fits perfectly into this criterion. Not only is she creative, clever in management and skilled at colour combination, she is also precise and dynamic in her freehand decoration, never losing sight of the importance of series production, while paying close attention to contemporary trends regarding concept and design.

This is her way of working, where conceptualisation and theory are fleshed out well before the clay is even entrusted to her hands, or for that matter to interpretation or to whim. Due to this, the experimentations that characterised her postmodern flavoured work at the beginning of the '80s were welcomed into the artistic movement of the 'Nuova Ceramica' (New Ceramics), a group of artists curated by art critics Franco Solmi and Marilena Pasquali (1982-1984), having also had shows in the Tokyo Department Stores of Seibu) and the movement 'A Tempo e A Fuoco' (In Rhythm and In Fire), curated by Vittorio Fagone (1983-85).

During this period, with her series Le Preziose (The Precious Ones), she furthered her work in industry production, in particular for the manufacturer, Flavia Ceramics (Bitossi), in Montelupo Fiorentino. Periods of study and teaching in Japan at Toki-Shi, in France at Limoges, in England at Portsmouth and in Belgium at Turnhout, served to broaden her awareness of a variety of materials, from porcelain to jewellery. In Raku Dolce of 2003, she produced an unpublished series of vases with a black and white motif, research that merited winning First Prize at the competition, Il Vaso Officinale (The Officinal Vase), in Collegno, Turin.

Like any artist belonging to the Faentino culture, which is dedicated to utility, her attention orients itself toward renewing the forms and design of the artisan. A sort of mix between artist and artisan, she moves toward a new language altogether where the work becomes--as if innately so--an object of the times, concrete. And this is where her collaboration with two top quality botteghe (studios) in Faenza, those of Antonio Liverani and Laura Silvagni, was born. The former association being of a limited edition series of objects decorated with a floral motif. During his presentation at the Flora Magna Collection in 1997, the Director of the International Ceramics Museum of Faenza, Gian Carlo Bojani, said, "Now we are able to see in which direction those fleshy pinks are going, those swollen expanses: they have become rose vases, or are they vase roses?

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Between Art Research & Technology: Antonella Cimatti
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.